Kids ban for jailed sex gang

A GANG of sexual predators who preyed on vulnerable young girls on the streets of South Yorkshire have been banned from ever being alone with children again.

The five Rotherham men - already locked up for a total of 32-and-a-half years after being found guilty of sexually assaulting girls as young as 13 - have now been issued with Sexual Offences Prevention Orders to ensure they are never in a position to ever abuse young girls again.

Razwan Razaq, aged 30, of Oxford Street, Clifton, his brother Umar Razaq, 24, also of Oxford Street, their cousin Mohammed Ramzan, 21, of Broom Grove, Broom, and friends Adil Hussain, 20, of Nelson Street, Clifton, and Mohsin Khan, 21, of Haworth Crescent, Moorgate, were told they must never seek or be in the company of any girl under the age of 16 if the youngsters do not have a parent or guardian present.

Razwan Razaq, Umar Razaq, Mohammed Ramzan and Mohsin Khan - who cruised the streets of Rotherham looking for young girls to have sex with - have also been banned from ever being in a car with anyone under the age of 16 if the child's parent or guardian is not there.

The men were jailed in November for sexually assaulting two girls aged 13 and another aged 16 in cars, alleyways and car parks in Rotherham and at the teenagers' homes.

Sheffield Crown Court heard the gang duped the girls into believing they were in loving relationships but used them for sexual gratification.

The orders, which do allow the men to be in the company of young relatives, will remain in place indefinitely.

Judge Peter Kelson QC, who issued the orders, said: "You all know this is designed to protect young girls or girls who you try to convince yourselves might just be 16 when they are not."

He said part of the case centred around some of the men "cruising the streets" looking for girls.

The orders come after former Home Secretary Jack Straw claimed vulnerable young white girls were seen as "easy meat" by sexual predators and it was a "specific problem" among young men in the Pakistani community.

He spoke out after the ringleaders of a gang which subjected a string of vulnerable girls to rapes and sexual assaults in Derby were jailed indefinitely.

The Labour MP said while most sex offenders were white, "there is a specific problem which involves Pakistani heritage men...who target vulnerable young white girls".

He said: "We need to get the Pakistani community to think much more clearly about why this is going on and to be more open about the problems that are leading to a number of Pakistani heritage men thinking it is OK to target white girls in this way."

Mr Straw said because girls from the Pakistani community were "off limits" they preyed on white girls instead.

"They see these young women, white girls who are vulnerable, some of them in care...who they think are easy meat.

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Latest sport And because they're vulnerable they ply them with gifts, they give them drugs, and then of course they're trapped."

But speaking after the hearing Det Sgt Dave Walker, from South Yorkshire Police's public protection unit, said the Rotherham case was about the "availability" of girls rather than their race.

He said "mathematically" there are more white British girls out at night and therefore at risk of being preyed upon by predators intent on befriending them with the ultimate aim of sexually abusing them.

"I can only talk about what happened in Rotherham regarding this case.

"We are not talking about offences committed against a certain section of the community or any one ethnic group - it was about availability.

"Western white girls probably have more freedom than some from other ethic groups and may be out more at night.

"I would say if this group had come across girls of different ethnic backgrounds they would have been treated no differently.

"It's no doubt they went out looking for girls. Razwan Razaq said it was part of his life."

DS Walker said the girls did not initially class themselves as "victims" because they had been duped into believing their abusers were their boyfriends.

"They were unwilling complainants - they saw themselves as boyfriends and girlfriends. That's what the grooming process is," he added.

By Claire Lewis

Crime Reporter

claire lewis

News Reporter

A GANG of sexual predators who preyed on vulnerable young girls on the streets of South Yorkshire have been banned from ever being alone with children again.

The five Rotherham men - already locked up for a total of 32-and-a-half years after being found guilty of sexually assaulting girls as young as 13 - have now been issued with Sexual Offences Prevention Orders to ensure they are never in a position to ever abuse young girls again.

Razwan Razaq, aged 30, of Oxford Street, Clifton, his brother Umar Razaq, 24, also of Oxford Street, their cousin Mohammed Ramzan, 21, of Broom Grove, Broom, and friends Adil Hussain, 20, of Nelson Street, Clifton, and Mohsin Khan, 21, of Haworth Crescent, Moorgate, were told they must never seek or be in the company of any girl under the age of 16 if the youngsters do not have a parent or guardian present.

Razwan Razaq, Umar Razaq, Mohammed Ramzan and Mohsin Khan - who cruised the streets of Rotherham looking for young girls to have sex with - have also been banned from ever being in a car with anyone under the age of 16 if the child's parent or guardian is not there.

The men were jailed in November for sexually assaulting two girls aged 13 and another aged 16 in cars, alleyways and car parks in Rotherham and at the teenagers' homes.

Sheffield Crown Court heard the gang duped the girls into believing they were in loving relationships but used them for sexual gratification.

The orders, which do allow the men to be in the company of young relatives, will remain in place indefinitely.

Judge Peter Kelson QC, who issued the orders, said: "You all know this is designed to protect young girls or girls who you try to convince yourselves might just be 16 when they are not."

He said part of the case centred around some of the men "cruising the streets" looking for girls.

The orders come after former Home Secretary Jack Straw claimed vulnerable young white girls were seen as "easy meat" by sexual predators and it was a "specific problem" among young men in the Pakistani community.

He spoke out after the ringleaders of a gang which subjected a string of vulnerable girls to rapes and sexual assaults in Derby were jailed indefinitely.

The Labour MP said while most sex offenders were white, "there is a specific problem which involves Pakistani heritage men...who target vulnerable young white girls".

He said: "We need to get the Pakistani community to think much more clearly about why this is going on and to be more open about the problems that are leading to a number of Pakistani heritage men thinking it is OK to target white girls in this way."

Mr Straw said because girls from the Pakistani community were "off limits" they preyed on white girls instead.

"They see these young women, white girls who are vulnerable, some of them in care...who they think are easy meat. And because they're vulnerable they ply them with gifts, they give them drugs, and then of course they're trapped."

But speaking after the hearing Det Sgt Dave Walker, from South Yorkshire Police's public protection unit, said the Rotherham case was about the "availability" of girls rather than their race.

He said "mathematically" there are more white British girls out at night and therefore at risk of being preyed upon by predators intent on befriending them with the ultimate aim of sexually abusing them.

"I can only talk about what happened in Rotherham regarding this case.

"We are not talking about offences committed against a certain section of the community or any one ethnic group - it was about availability.

"Western white girls probably have more freedom than some from other ethic groups and may be out more at night.

"I would say if this group had come across girls of different ethnic backgrounds they would have been treated no differently.

"It's no doubt they went out looking for girls. Razwan Razaq said it was part of his life."

DS Walker said the girls did not initially class themselves as "victims" because they had been duped into believing their abusers were their boyfriends.

"They were unwilling complainants - they saw themselves as boyfriends and girlfriends. That's what the grooming process is," he added.

Went looking for girls: Razwan Razaq, 30.

Guilty of sexual assault: Adil Hussain, 20.

Groomed young girls: Mohsin Khan, 21.

Cruised the streets: Umar Razaq, 24.

Behind bars: Mohammed Ramzan, 21.

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