From the seaside back to the city

Ian Breakwell at De La Warr Pavillion. Courtesy of the estate of Ian Breakwell and Tate Archive with thanks to the De La Warr Pavilion � Tate London
Ian Breakwell at De La Warr Pavillion. Courtesy of the estate of Ian Breakwell and Tate Archive with thanks to the De La Warr Pavilion � Tate London
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MOST folk visiting the coast come back with a few snaps and maybe a stick of rock.

For Derbyshire-born British artist Ian Breakwell a trip to the Sussex seaside arguably represented a career-enhancing experience that now gives Millennium Gallery visitors a taste of the East Sussex shoreline.

The Other Side is a direct consequence of Ian’s 2000 visit to Bexhill-on-Sea’s De La Warr Pavilion where he was taken by the tea dances frequently held on the terrace of the iconic Modernist building overlooking the sea.

The Other Side was filmed and compiled as a result of these observation and until January Museums Sheffield will present this romantic, melancholy reflection of life and mortality as a large scale projection for free.

Ian died in 2005 having established an impressive international reputation throughout the second half of the 20th century for work encompassing painting, photography, film and collage.

He is represented in various national and international collections, including those of Tate, V&A, the National Portrait Gallery and the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

The Other Side forms part of Art in Yorkshire, supported by Tate in a year-long celebration of art in galleries throughout Yorkshire in 2011.

The installation features footage of elderly couples slowly waltzing against the setting sun coupled with Franz Schubert’s Nocturne in E-flat Major (Op.148), interwoven with the noise of gulls and crashing waves.

Ian said of the work: “The continuous motion of the camera moving smoothly backwards and forwards on its track, coupled with the slow, haunting intensity of Schubert’s music and the sound of the rhythmically lapping waves is intended to induce a hypnotic, trance like mood of disorientation in the viewer.”

Alison Morton, Exhibition Programmer at Museums Sheffield, adds: “The Other Side is really immersive and moving, so when visitors step in from the gallery’s busy main thoroughfare they are going to be immediately transported away from the urban hustle and bustle.”