Food lovers flock to Bakewell Baking Festival

Celebrity Chef Tom Herbert Bakewell baking festival
Celebrity Chef Tom Herbert Bakewell baking festival
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Bakers who have risen to fame on the small screen took centre stage at a baking festival.

Stars of the Great British Bake Off – Edd Kimber, Iain Watters and Howard Middleton – were among the celebrities at the Bakewell Baking Festival.

The DJ for the vintage music Bakewell baking festival

The DJ for the vintage music Bakewell baking festival

Thousands of food-lovers from all over the country flocked to the town’s showground for the three-day celebration of vintage and baking.

They were treated to a real nostalgia fest packed with attractions that included cupcake and gingerbread decorating, a live cake decorating final, a Teddy Bear’s Picnic, chapati making and ‘tea appreciation’.

There were also artisan bread makers, creative bakers and biscuit makers as well as a selection of hand-picked food and drink suppliers, including cheesemakers and chocolatiers.

The festival was first held in the centre of Bakewell two years ago, but moved to the showground this year.

Bakewell baking festival

Bakewell baking festival

Organisers aimed to recreate the atmosphere of a traditional country fete but on a larger canvas.

Festival director Paul Morgans said: “We’re creating the ultimate country festival, an event with all the charms of the country fete but on a much bigger scale and with celebrity appearances thrown into the mix.

“Bakewell is the home of the famous pudding to which it gave its name, and that makes it the perfect place for this festival.”

Iain delighted the crowd by recreating a Derbyshire version of the dish which landed him on the front pages of national newspapers last year. He whipped up support with his Bakewell Alaska – a confection of frangipane, ice cream, cherries and Italian meringue – during a live demonstration.

Crowds singing along to the vintage music Bakewell baking festival

Crowds singing along to the vintage music Bakewell baking festival

Iain exited the BBC’s Bake Off series in dramatic fashion when he dumped his melted Baked Alaska in the bin.

The popularity of baking has soared in recent years.

In 2013 the home baking industry was valued at £3.4 billion, and shops have reported an uplift in sales of ingredients, cake stands, sieves, measuring cups and other paraphernalia.

After the Bake Off show started in 2010, searches on Google for the word ‘cake’ more than doubled, and attendance has risen at clubs and societies. One of the largest national groups, the Clandestine Cake Club, was set up in Leeds five years ago. There are now almost 200 regional organisations.

Celebrity Chef Tom Herbert enjoying the festival Bakewell baking festival

Celebrity Chef Tom Herbert enjoying the festival Bakewell baking festival

Paul said: “The sun shone down on the festival, which was a huge success.”

Thousands of food-lovers from all over the country flocked to the town’s showground for the three-day celebration of vintage and baking.

They were treated to a real nostalgia fest packed with attractions that included cupcake and gingerbread decorating, a live cake decorating final, a Teddy Bear’s Picnic, chapati making and ‘tea appreciation’.

There were also artisan bread makers, creative bakers and biscuit makers as well as a selection of hand-picked food and drink suppliers, including cheesemakers and chocolatiers.

The festival was first held in the centre of Bakewell two years ago, but moved to the showground this year.

Organisers aimed to recreate the atmosphere of a traditional country fete but on a larger canvas.

Michelle Dransfield, Elise Clarkson and Rachel Dudle Bakewell baking festival

Michelle Dransfield, Elise Clarkson and Rachel Dudle Bakewell baking festival

Festival director Paul Morgans said: “We’re creating the ultimate country festival, an event with all the charms of the country fete but on a much bigger scale and with celebrity appearances thrown into the mix.

“Bakewell is the home of the famous pudding to which it gave its name, and that makes it the perfect place for this festival.”

Iain delighted the crowd by recreating a Derbyshire version of the dish which landed him on the front pages of national newspapers last year. He whipped up support with his Bakewell Alaska – a confection of frangipane, ice cream, cherries and Italian meringue – during a live demonstration.

Iain exited the BBC’s Bake Off series in dramatic fashion when he dumped his melted Baked Alaska in the bin.

The popularity of baking has soared in recent years.

In 2013 the home baking industry was valued at £3.4 billion, and shops have reported an uplift in sales of ingredients, cake stands, sieves, measuring cups and other paraphernalia.

After the Bake Off show started in 2010, searches on Google for the word ‘cake’ more than doubled, and attendance has risen at clubs and societies. One of the largest national groups, the Clandestine Cake Club, was set up in Leeds five years ago. There are now almost 200 regional organisations.

Paul said: “The sun shone down on the festival, which was a huge success.”

Cakes by Strawberry Kitchen Bakery Bakewell baking festival

Cakes by Strawberry Kitchen Bakery Bakewell baking festival

Crowds at the festival Bakewell baking festival

Crowds at the festival Bakewell baking festival

Bakewell Baking Festival Director Paul Morgans with Celebrity Chef Tom Herbert

Bakewell Baking Festival Director Paul Morgans with Celebrity Chef Tom Herbert

Crowds gather to hear Tom Herbert's demonstration Bakewell baking festival

Crowds gather to hear Tom Herbert's demonstration Bakewell baking festival