Explorer Scott’s silver service up for auction

This month marks the centenary of the death - on or around March 29,1912 - of Scott of the Antarctic,who froze to death on his way back from the South Pole.'        Now it is revealed that Scott's final months in the Antarctic were made more bearable by Sheffield-made cutlery and crockery which is expected to fetch a total of �7500 at an auction which will coincide with the 100th anniversary of Scott's death.'      Sheffield items include :'      A solid silver entree dish used on Scott's ill fated 1910-1912 expedition is set to fetch between �2,000 and �3,000.Made in Sheffield by Walker and Henderson.'      An electroplated silver toast rack made in Sheffield by Walker and Hall,estimated at �1500 and �2000.'      A silver plated marrow scoop made by Walker and Henderson �400 to �500
This month marks the centenary of the death - on or around March 29,1912 - of Scott of the Antarctic,who froze to death on his way back from the South Pole.' Now it is revealed that Scott's final months in the Antarctic were made more bearable by Sheffield-made cutlery and crockery which is expected to fetch a total of �7500 at an auction which will coincide with the 100th anniversary of Scott's death.' Sheffield items include :' A solid silver entree dish used on Scott's ill fated 1910-1912 expedition is set to fetch between �2,000 and �3,000.Made in Sheffield by Walker and Henderson.' An electroplated silver toast rack made in Sheffield by Walker and Hall,estimated at �1500 and �2000.' A silver plated marrow scoop made by Walker and Henderson �400 to �500
0
Have your say

Scott of the Antarctic’s ill fated expedition ended in tragedy when he and his men froze to death on their way back from the South Pole in March 1912 - 100 years ago this month.

Scott took Sheffield-made silver tableware on his Antarctic mission - and even noted in his journal on October 15, 1911: “It is satisfactory to find that various dishes maintain their excellence.”

Now, to coincide with the centenary of Scott’s death on or around March 29, 1912, some of the Sheffield silver from that famous expedition has been put up for sale and is expected to fetch between £13,000 and £20,000 at Bonhams in London on March 30.

The most valuable Sheffield treasure is an electroplated cruet set from the wardroom of the Scott expedition ship, the Terra Nova, with a band engraved ‘British Antarctic Expedition Terra Nova RYS’ surrounding a penguin on the Pole.

It was made by Sheffield-firm Walker & Henderson and is expected to sell for between £6,000 and £9,000. Four forks, two fish knives and a spoon, also made by Walker & Henderson and which also feature the expedition emblem, are valued at between £3,000 and £4,000.

A solid silver entree dish, made by Walker & Henderson and featuring the expedition emblem, could sell for between £2,000 and £3,000.

An electroplated six slice toast rack, made by Walker and Hall, is tipped to fetch between £1,500 and £2,000, as are three forks and two spoons being sold together.

A Stilton scoop, made by Walker & Henderson, is valued at between £400 and £600.

The cruet set was ‘rescued’ and kept as a memento of the expedition by Irish-born Petty Officer Patrick Keohane, who was a member of the search party which found the frozen bodies of Scott, Edward Wilson and Henry ‘Birdie’ Bowers in November 1912, eight months after they died.

Most of the Sheffield items were then kept by Frederick John Hooper, the steward on the Terra Nova and also a member of the search party.

Mr Hooper ended up living in Southport, where he died aged 64 in 1955. Earlier this year a blue plaque was put up in Southport to commemorate his time there.