Double trouble - and joy - twice over

Quads: Our First Year - Parents Julian and Sharon Turner with quads (l-r centre) Emily, James, (l-r front) Joshua and Lauren.

Quads: Our First Year - Parents Julian and Sharon Turner with quads (l-r centre) Emily, James, (l-r front) Joshua and Lauren.

0
Have your say

For most first-time parents, the idea of looking after one baby can be daunting enough.

But Sharon and Julian Turner faced an even bigger challenge when they became the proud parents of quads.

The two sets of identical twins – two boys and two girls – were born at extraordinary odds of 70 million to one, but as this documentary discovers as it follows the family over the course of a year, it had looked like the chances of the Turners ever having children at all were incredibly slim.

The couple had spent tens of thousands of pounds on three unsuccessful rounds of IVF and were advised to give up on their dream of conceiving a child. However, they decided to persevere, and after visiting an IVF clinic in Greece, Sharon became pregnant.

For Julian, it was little short of a miracle. “I’m feeling in awe and amazement that we have four babies.

Because up until the moment they were born, I didn’t think it would happen for us. We’ve been through so many rounds of IVF it’s all been a bit of a nightmare.”

However, that doesn’t mean it has all been plain sailing. James, Joshua, Lauren and Emily were born prematurely, weighing just two-and-a-half pounds each, and spent their early weeks in a special baby care unit, with their parents keeping a vigil at their bedsides.

Sharon says: “They’re so tiny – I’m almost scared to pick them up, which I know sounds crazy, but I don’t want any harm to come to them, I don’t want to break them.”

Fortunately, all four survived, and the cameras are there to capture the emotional moment when the Turners finally bring their children home.

There isn’t much time for the Turners to relax though, as they begin the demanding job of caring for four premature infants – and even with grandparents moving in to help, it proves to be a steep learning curve.

Sharon had never changed a nappy before (Julian had practised on a doll), but suddenly, the couple finding themselves facing endless changes, 24 feeds a day, and exhausting nights.

Back to the top of the page