Lamp that burned gas from Victorian sewers given protected status in South Yorkshire

Sewer Gas Destructor Lamp, Stewart Street, Sheffield
Sewer Gas Destructor Lamp, Stewart Street, Sheffield
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A lamp that burned gas from Victorian sewers and part of a locomotive factory used to build The Flying Scotsman are among the unusual South Yorkshire heritage given protected status.

Government heritage body Historic England has published some of the highlights from the 510 places listed over the past year.

Jon Scully, pictured playing the bugle during the memorial at Bennetthorpe war memorial, Doncaster. Picture: Marie Caley NDFP 04-08-14 WW1 MC 1

Jon Scully, pictured playing the bugle during the memorial at Bennetthorpe war memorial, Doncaster. Picture: Marie Caley NDFP 04-08-14 WW1 MC 1

A sewer gas destructor lamp, on Stewart Road, Sharrow Vale, which once burned methane and stagnant gases that built up in urban sewers, is one of seven places in South Yorkshire added to the National Heritage List.

The Grade II lamp in Sheffield is one of 82 once located around the city. Gas destructor lamps were located where there was a pocket of gas and aimed to deal safely with the build-up of methane and stagnant gases in urban sewers.

The erecting shop at the Plant Works in Doncaster is given Grade II status on the list.

It was built in 1890 and 1891 to increase site capacity and accommodate the ever-larger locomotives being built. It consisted of two large erecting bays with overhead cranes separated by a narrower central bay housing machinery and equipment, and had a total capacity of 20 engines.

Old Hall Farmhouse in Brightholmlee has been given national heritage protected status.

Old Hall Farmhouse in Brightholmlee has been given national heritage protected status.

The shed was used to assemble some of the most successful and iconic locomotives ever built, particularly those manufactured to the designs of renowned railway engineer Sir Nigel Gresley, including the Flying Scotsman.

The Grade II Old Hall Farmhouse, Brightholmlee Lane, Brightholmlee, Sheffield, and the roadside barns and outbuildings in its yard also appear alongside a First World War training area on Redmires Road, Lodge Moor.

The Sheffield City Battalion used the Lord’s Seat, on the eastern edge of the Hallam Moors, until the end of the war when the area was then returned to agricultural land.

Also added is the Bennetthorpe War Memorial, in Doncaster, and the Keeper’s Cottage and Kennels at Cusworth Hall in Cusworth, north of Doncaster – both listed as Grade II.

Heritage Minister Tracey Crouch said: “By protecting our national heritage through listing we leave a vital legacy for generations now and in the future.

“From an ancient henge in Yorkshire to bus stations in Milton Keynes, it’s great to see we have protected such a rich variety of heritage sites this year.

“All of these places have a unique role in telling us the story of the people who built and used these structures, whether it’s our earliest ancestors or today’s commuters.”

Roger Bowdler, designation director at Historic England, said: “Keeping the National Heritage List for England up to date is at the very heart of what Historic England does.

“These highlights demonstrate the richness of our historic environment – from the traces of our Neolithic past to Cold War military sites and everyday places such as playgrounds and hairdressers.

“The list is not just the official database for England’s most important sites and structures: it is a celebration of our special places and ensures that England’s history is recognised, respected and enjoyed.”