Celebrating 125 years of The Sheffield Star

Lotty, three, and Gethin Mottram, two from Wadsley at Sheffield Star's 125th Anniversary exhibition at Weston Park Museum
Lotty, three, and Gethin Mottram, two from Wadsley at Sheffield Star's 125th Anniversary exhibition at Weston Park Museum
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A LOT has changed in Sheffield over the last 125 years.

The first electric tram, visits from the royals and the homecoming of the English Cup are just a selection of occasions to grace the city.

And now these iconic events are being brought back to life by a new display at Sheffield’s Weston Park museum to celebrate the 125th anniversary of The Star.

The display features a range of stories with the original headlines including ‘the death of the Queen’ in 1901 and ‘Ripper: man 
arrested in Sheffield’ in 1981.

Visiting assistant Daniel Drew, aged 30, said: “It is a good piece to have in the showroom.

“Sheffield has been through some turbulent times and the local newspaper has seen it all.

“125 years is a huge amount of time and it is great to show the different periods of Sheffield history.”

Visitors can follow the development of The Star and relive the news that hit the headlines throughout the decades.

Early examples of digital cameras are also on display along with a variety of school photographs.

Teacher Joe Willis, 24, said: “Nowadays all the photographs would be in colour and HD.

“It is amazing how far technology has come. It is completely different to back then.”

Student John Dickinson, aged 16, said: “Back then you used to have to wait months to have a photograph developed but now its instant.

“I don’t know how it could have all worked but I’ve always been intrigued by it.”

The display is open now and will continue until Sunday, November 4.

The Star digital community editor Nancy Fielder, who created the display, said: “It was really fascinating going through 125 years of newspapers to dig out some of The Star’s most interesting memorabilia.

“We hope there’s lots to bring back memories for everyone.

“There are also lots of photos and we’d love to hear from anyone who recognises relatives in them.”

n Nancy will be giving a talk entitled 125 Years of The Star in Sheffield at the museum as part of Off the Shelf, Sheffield’s festival of words.

Her talk takes place on Friday, October 26 at the museum and admission is free.

Visitors are invited to take along their own photos to share with readers of The Star.