‘Worst audience’ for punk Pistols

07/01/1977. PA File Photo of  Punk rock group The Sex Pistols tearing an EMI poster after the announcement that they have split with their record company. EMI said it felt unable to promote the group in view of adverse publicity..  See PA Feature MUSIC Lydon. Picture credit should read: PA Archive/PA Photos. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature MUSIC Lydon.

07/01/1977. PA File Photo of Punk rock group The Sex Pistols tearing an EMI poster after the announcement that they have split with their record company. EMI said it felt unable to promote the group in view of adverse publicity.. See PA Feature MUSIC Lydon. Picture credit should read: PA Archive/PA Photos. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature MUSIC Lydon.

0
Have your say

They were five sneering London lads who, despite only being on the music scene for a matter of years, went on to become one of the most influential bands in history.

Punk icons The Sex Pistols exploded onto a staid music scene with their brand of filth and fury.

Johnny Rotten, Glenn Matlock, Steve Jones, Sid Vicious and Paul Cook all featured during three chaotic years from 1975-1978 and this Sunday marks the 39th anniversary of their appearance at Doncaster’s Outlook Club in the autumn of 1976.

The club is now long gone, buried by Doncaster Interchange, but memories of the gig remain, along with another appearance by the band on August 24, 1977 when they returned, this time under the name The Tax Exiles.

While they were in the town the first time they signed their infamous record deal with EMI.

They later attacked the record label in their song EMI when it sacked them after just three months.

Reviewer Pete Scott remembered one of the gigs not for the raucous music on stage, but the behaviour of the bouncers off it.

He wrote: “One thing I really didn’t like were the scenes which went down prior to the set, when the bouncers threw their weight around with great impartiality.”

And Rotten berated the crowd too, describing them as “the worst audience I’ve ever played to.”

The gig waas recalled in the recent show Dancehall at Cast in Doncaster, which traced 80 years of the town’s history from the dancefloor.

Other famous musical visitors that the show recalled were The Beatles, who visited the Gaumont .in 1963, and David Bowie, who 10 years later played at the town’s Rank Theatre on his Aladdin Sane tour.

Back to the top of the page