Tramlines promises fine times for city...

Thousands of wristbands lit up the night sky as Xylobands, part owned by Coldplay, were seen for the first time at Sheffield's Tramlines Festival.
Thousands of wristbands lit up the night sky as Xylobands, part owned by Coldplay, were seen for the first time at Sheffield's Tramlines Festival.
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AHH Tramlines? The festival which absolutely no-one other than the odd journalist calls The Urban Glastonbury.

The fast-becoming-legendary Sheffield weekend, which returns for its fifth year from today, doesn’t really compare to the Somerset monster, does it? There’s less mud, less Home County types, and less aging rock stars enjoying the backstage refreshments, for starters.

But what Tramlines has is great bands (more than 600 to be precise), great venues (more than 70) and the great advantage of not having to camp in a field resembling a quagmire. Oh, and it has you lot. Great Sheffielders.

More than 80,000 of us will turn out. And according to The Star’s slightly unscientific research (ie. standing in Barker’s Pool asking passers by), we’re all looking forward to something slightly different.

“Girls,” says Josh Parson, 20, an air conditioning fitter of Wisewood. “I don’t have a one track mind or anything but Tramlines is all about talking to girls. What bands am I looking forward to? I don’t even know what bands are playing, mate.”

Danielle Miller is a girl. She, however, is looking forward to the good weather and vibes of Devonshire Green on Sunday afternoon.

“I know Tramlines is all about the party atmosphere but it’s lovely to just chill out on the Sunday,” says the 21-year-old shop assistant of Parson Cross. “I’m just keeping my fingers crossed the good weather stays.”

The weekend is more about dancing than chilling for Ellie Harrison.

“Me and my friends will be getting to the Main Stage as soon as it opens, going to the front and staying there dancing,” says the 16-year-old student of Chapeltown. “There’s never normally much to do for people my age in Sheffield but this is perfect, and it’s cheap.”

Dan Kirk won’t be at the Main Stage. He’ll be working at festival venue the Viper Rooms in Carver Street for much of the time (“free entry,” he pipes up) but plans on making the most of his hours off by checking out other bands and other bars.

“It’s going to be a few long decent days and nights,” says the 22-year-old graduate of Broomhall. “I’ll be venturing off the beaten track and discovering new music.”

Working too will be Ian Spooner, taking pictures of the street entertainment in Barker’s Pool. “I’m a photographer,” says the 54-year-old of Grenoside. “But this is definitely one of my favourite jobs of the year.”