No rest for The Wombats

The Wombats have just released their third studio album, Glitterbug.
The Wombats have just released their third studio album, Glitterbug.
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There is no rest for Liverpudlian marsupials.

The Wombats in the midst of a huge tour which included a show at The Leadmill in Sheffield and Saturday.

The UK leg ends in Newcastle-upon-Tyne on Sunday before the North America leg begins in Toronto, Canada just two days later – all in support of their third studio album, Glitterbug, which was released on Monday.

The band rose to fame in 2006 with their jagged indie pop,, including top-20 singles Moving to New York and Let’s Dance to Joy Division.

Now, nearly 10 years later, the band are still amassing fans.

One of their latest singles – Greek Tragedy – was hailed as ‘Hottest single of the Week’ by BBC Radio One’s Zane Lowe.

The best thing about that song was the amount of people who got in touch afterwards and said they could relate to it.

Dan Haggis, The Wombats drummer

The song is a synthy, dramatic love song – a subject that dominates almost all of Wombat’s numbers according to drummer Dan Haggis.

He says: “I’m not sure specifically where all the songs come from, but it’s always a real place.

“A lot of the lyrics are about the beginnings of relationships and the ends of relationships, the despair and the excitement.”

While The Wombats’ sound is poppy to the extreme, the band – Liverpudlians Dan and frontman Matt Murphy and Norwegian-born bassist Tord Øverland Knudsen – are not shy of more serious subject matter.

The band’s track Anti-D – one of the few songs not about love – is about Matt’s struggle with depression and society’s readiness to turn to anti depressants.

“I too am prescribed as freely as any decongestant,” he sings.

Dan says: “All the lyrics are drawn from the well of real life. And the best thing about that song was the amount of people who got in touch afterwards and said they could relate to it.

“When you get that kind of response from a song, it makes you realise it was all worthwhile.”

But it’s not just the lyrics that convey the nuances of being human with The Wombats. The band’s music is just as carefully crafted.

Dan says: “We always try and make the music speak. It has to give a sense of longing or whatever feeling it is the song’s lyrics are about.”

The band met in Liverpool, where they were studying at LIPA - the performing arts school founded by Paul McCartney.

“Liverpool is a great place,” Dan says. “There is something about it and when we were kids the fact The Beatles could come out of the same place was always an inspiring thought. If they could do it, we could do it.”

Indeed they have.

The Wombats are on tour now - for dates, see The Wombats official website.

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REVIEW: The Wombats at the Leadmill