Musician Mike gets to show off his sinister side at the Academy

Mike Hughes
Mike Hughes
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To many Sheffield music lovers, Mike Hughes needs no introductions.

The wild-haired singer songwriter has been gracing the city’s stages with his stomping, rhythmic and haunting songs for several years.

And next week, Hughes will play in the city once again, ahead of his next single release, Temple Blues, which hits the shelves – digital and wooden – next month.

But while it’s soon to be officially released, Hughes has been performing the song for a number of months.

Indeed, You Tube videos of Hughes’ live performances of the song pay testament to its popularity – crowds cheer in the background as the singer songwriter stamps his feet on the ground.

“I wrote it quite a while ago and I’ve performed it on several occasions but I worked with producer Ross Orton and we re-recorded it to create a much darker, fuller version.

“Ross is good at that - he always makes the drums heavier.

“I go in with these acoustic tracks and 
by the time he’s done with them they’re no longer acoustic.”

The album release follows his last single, The Road, which Hughes brought out in February this year.

“I don’t know what the album will be called yet but I am recording that with Ross Orton as well.

“Once I’ve written all the new material I’ll decide what’s going to be on the new album. Maybe it will be released towards the end of the year – although I said that last year.”

Hughes will be trying out new material in his forthcoming show. “I think I will be road-testing new material at the next gig.

“I’ll be with a band for that one and the band and I have only played a handful of gigs together and we’re writing new songs all the time.”

Hughes describes his new songs as ‘sinister’, although gives little away as to why.

“The songs are about being playful with themes and situations and making them sinister in a cinematic way.”

Hughes will bring his cinematic sinister repertoire to the O2 Academy, Arundel Gate, on Saturday June 21.