Film shows long-distance war is still hell

Good Kill with Bruce Greenwood as Colonel Jack Johns and Ethan Hawke as Major Thomas Egan. See PA Feature FILM Reviews. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/Lorey Sebastian/Arrow Films. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature FILM Reviews.
Good Kill with Bruce Greenwood as Colonel Jack Johns and Ethan Hawke as Major Thomas Egan. See PA Feature FILM Reviews. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/Lorey Sebastian/Arrow Films. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature FILM Reviews.
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Good Kill

Cert 15

To win a war in this age of hi-tech weaponry, governments still have to be prepared to sacrifice good men and women in the name of freedom.

There is no hard-fought victory without heartbreak on both sides of a conflict; for soldiers on the front line and the nameless civilians, whose deaths are mourned as collateral damage.

America’s use of drones during the war on terror has divided opinion.

On the one hand, these remotely-controlled craft can deliver devastating payloads with precision and if a drone is shot down, the pilot is safely back on home soil, witnessing the crash on a computer screen.

However, conducting war with joysticks using soldiers, who have been recruited at video-gaming conferences and have never experienced active duty, warps the moral fabric of combat.

Do you bear the same weight of responsibility for pulling a trigger when your unsuspecting target is thousands of miles away and can’t retaliate?

Good Kill is a provocative drama written and directed by Andrew Niccol, which probes the emotional strain on Air Force drone pilots and the ethical quagmire that engulfs them every time they follow orders.

Hot Tub Time Machine 2 Cert 15

Steve Pink returns to the director’s chair for this sequel to his 2010 raunchy buddy comedy about four 21st century men, propelled back in time to 1986, where they were forced to repeat the same mistakes in order to minimise the ripple effect in the future.

In the second film, party guy Lou Dorchen (Rob Corddry), his childhood pals Adam (John Cusack) and Nick (Craig Robinson) and Adam’s techno-savvy nephew Jacob (Clark Duke) have all exploited time travel for personal gain.

In particular, Lou has become a self-centred boor as a result of his temporal leaps and he treats family, friends and work colleagues with disdain.

During a massive party at the Dorchen residence, the lights go out and someone shoots and badly injures Lou.

With time of the essence, Nick, Jacob and Lou add nitrotrinadium to the hot tub so they can travel back to before the ill-fated shindig and stop the gun man or woman from pulling the trigger.

Woman in Gold

Cert 12A

One woman challenges the legal status quo to correct a terrible injustice in this drama based on a true story, directed by Simon Curtis.

Shortly before the Second World War, Nazis confiscate numerous artworks including Gustav Klimt’s iconic painting Portrait Of Adele Bloch-Bauer I from wealthy industrialist Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer.

Following his death, the priceless canvases go on display at the Austrian State Gallery, as stipulated by Ferdinand’s late wife Adele.

However, Ferdinand names his relatives including his niece Maria Altmann (Helen Mirren), who survived the Holocaust, as inheritors of his estate.

From her home in Los Angeles, Maria launches a protracted and bitter legal battle against the Austrian government to reclaim the painting, flanked by idealistic young lawyer E Randol Schoenberg (Ryan Reynolds).

Together, they invest 10 years in the case, taking their grievance to the Supreme Court of the United States in the hope of securing a landmark victory.