Pupils race ahead with Tour de France artwork

Pupils from Meadstead Primary School Academy, Royston, went sculpting at the old HMV shop in Barnsley

Pupils from Meadstead Primary School Academy, Royston, went sculpting at the old HMV shop in Barnsley

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Wheely good sculptures that will welcome elite cyclists to South Yorkshire have been crafted by creative youngsters.

The artwork – which ranges from mosaic heads to wire cyclists – was put together at a pop up studio in Barnsley as part of the Tour de France cultural festival.

Pupils from Meadstead Primary School Academy, Royston, went sculpting at the old HMV shop in Barnsley on Friday (11 April 2014). Our picture shows, from left, Dillon Lee, Katy Hirst, Deakin Driver, Megan Whitehouse, all aged 11, teaching assistant Jacob Simon and Lewis Trepczyk, aged 11, with a sculpture made by artist Carole Beavis.

Pupils from Meadstead Primary School Academy, Royston, went sculpting at the old HMV shop in Barnsley on Friday (11 April 2014). Our picture shows, from left, Dillon Lee, Katy Hirst, Deakin Driver, Megan Whitehouse, all aged 11, teaching assistant Jacob Simon and Lewis Trepczyk, aged 11, with a sculpture made by artist Carole Beavis.

They will soon be installed around the town before being moved to various locations along the Penistone to Dunford Bridge stretch of the Transpennine Trail – in time for the world’s biggest sporting event in July.

Alison Cooper, project manager, helped more than 200 primary school children and community groups work with wire and cables to create the unusual sculptures.

The former HMV store on Cheapside was turned into an art station for the wonderful workshops.

Alison said: “It has been such a rewarding project.

“This is a once-in-a-lifetime chance to be part of the Tour de France. We will never get to see this again in Yorkshire.

“We wanted to celebrate that in Barnsley – we are lucky that the Tour will just touch the edges of the town.”

Willow sculptor Carole Beavis, mosaic artist Amanda Wray, contemporary wire topography artist Paul Matosic and a wire sculptor from the Faceless Company helped young people perfect their artwork.

And once the race is over, the artwork will still be standing.

Alison added: “We expect the lifetime of the artwork to be about seven years so we will be able to go back out to see them and remember the tour.”

 

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