Olympics: Barnsley’s Ed Clancy going for cycling gold

Leading the way: Barnsley's Ed Clancy at the front of the men's pursuit team at the National Velodrome, Newport. picture: Tim Ireland/PA Wire.

Leading the way: Barnsley's Ed Clancy at the front of the men's pursuit team at the National Velodrome, Newport. picture: Tim Ireland/PA Wire.

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BARNSLEY’S Ed Clancy has been confirmed in the team that will represent one of Great Britain’s best chances for a gold medal at the Olympic Games.

The decision to include the 27-year-old in the men’s pursuit team is no surprise with Clancy the man who sets the pace at the start.

Clancy has been a key member of the pursuit squad and was part of the team which set a new world record of 3:53.295 in winning the gold medal at the 2012 World Track Cycling Championships in Melbourne, Australia, in March.

Britain are expected to cruise through the heats at the velodrome in the Olympic Park on August 2 before battling for a medal a day later.

Clancy was part of the team that won gold in Beijing four years ago.

That line up also included Bradley Wiggins - who looks set to become the first British winner of the Tour de France tomorrow when the race reaches Paris.

Perhaps the next most famous British cyclist after Wiggins is Sir Chris Hoy, who won three gold medals in Beijing. However, Hoy, aged 36, will only be able to defend two of them after Jason Kenny was selected for the men’s individual sprint.

Kenny’s selection leaves Hoy to focus on defending his team sprint and keirin titles.

Despite his disappointment, Hoy magnanimously said that a selection team headed by performance director Dave Brailsford had made the correct decision.

He said: “They made the right call. It is not about individual ambition - it’s about the team getting the most number of gold medals.

“Therefore you could say you are spreading yourself a bit thin by having one guy taking part in three events, but that is not why they have made the decision. They have picked the best sprinter.”

But Hoy believes that his non-selection for the individual sprint may improve his chances of success in the keirin and team sprint thanks to the extra rest he will get between the two disciplines. It means I have got the chance to have a proper recovery between the team sprint and the keirin which is a bit of a luxury really,” he said.

“It means I can give it everything in the team sprint and then get that out the way and prepare for the keirin.”

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