Racing: Turner suffers further injury setback

Jockey Hayley Turner. Photo: David Davies/PA Wire
Jockey Hayley Turner. Photo: David Davies/PA Wire
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Hayley Turner has been forced to put her racing return on hold after an MRI scan revealed a pelvic injury.

The former Northern Racing College student was hoping to return to the saddle in the next two weeks following her horror fall at Doncaster’s St Leger meeting earlier this month but she now faces another spell on the sidelines.

Writing in her exclusive blog on www.racinguk.com, the jockey said: “I’m gutted. I’ve just had an MRI scan back which has revealed that I have chipped my pelvis bone.

“It’s incredibly frustrating because my initial x-rays and scans - following my fall at the Leger meeting a fortnight ago - showed nothing.

“I was first examined at the hospital in Doncaster and then as I was still hurting I went to Cambridge A&E five days later. It took a bit of time to persuade them to examine me and then they weren’t too keen on giving me crutches either. I was treated as if I was being a nuisance and making a meal of my injury.

“Anyway, that x-ray revealed nothing, so I convinced myself that I was just sore from the fall and learnt how to get around in a way that didn’t hurt.

“I wasn’t in unbearable pain or anything like that but my physio, Kevin Hunt, was very suspicious and wasn’t convinced so I decided to go down the private healthcare route. I was originally told that I could have a scan at the end of next week under my insurance, but couldn’t wait that long, so paid for one last night.

“One small mercy is it’s a clean break so it’s a case of waiting for it to heal and knit together.

“I have no idea how long that will take. It could be a couple of weeks, it could be more - I’ve never had anything like this before and my physio isn’t too sure either, so I’ll wait to see what the specialist says.

“I still have the Exogen Ultrasound bone-healing system which I used for 20 minutes every day to help knit my broken ankle, and it certainly helped, so I’ll be using that on my pelvis and see if it can work its magic.”

Turner believes more needs to be done when a jockey arrives at hospital to explain the potential injuries they may have suffered.

She added: “I understand that a doctor can’t leave the racecourse as they would hold up racing but I do think in cases like mine, a PJA representative or someone with a medical background should accompany the jockey to hospital so they can explain to the doctors exactly what happened.

“Doctors might not realise you’ve fallen off at 40mph and been hurled to the ground and trampled over. I was feeling very groggy and couldn’t actually remember the fall, but if someone had been with me they might have been able to show a clip of the race on their phone or tablet and then the doctors might have given me a more thorough examination and x-ray.

“Look what happened to Micky Fenton. He was discharged from hospital following after a crushing fall at Chepstow earlier this month after x-rays and scans revealed nothing. A few days later he sought further medical advice which revealed he’d broken his neck! He could have been paralysed.”