Chris Holt’s Sheffield Wednesday Column: Foreign coaches are here to stay...get used to it

Owls head coach Carlos Carvalhal with Huddersfield Town's David Wagner, two foreign coaches who have more than proved their worth so far
Owls head coach Carlos Carvalhal with Huddersfield Town's David Wagner, two foreign coaches who have more than proved their worth so far
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Last week there was faux-outrage from some quarters of the game when a man of little or no managerial experience was overlooked for a job in the Premier League for one whose experience in that particular aspect had seen him travel the globe and also lead his country to the World Cup.

Why the outrage? Well one, it was Ryan Giggs, who seemingly, many believe should be able to walk into a job now because he played about a million games and therefore knows what he’s talking about. And two, because, horror of horrors, the man Swansea chose to be their new boss...is FOREIGN!

Ryan Giggs, left, was overlooked for the Swansea job

Ryan Giggs, left, was overlooked for the Swansea job

Imagine that.

Bob Bradley was chosen by decision-makers at the Welsh club, who interviewed Giggs and felt that he wasn’t the right man to steer the Swans away from the perils of relegation.

Some who argued against the Manchester United failing to get the post threw up all manner of reasons why Giggs was the man for the job, though left out the fact that you could count on one hand the number of times he’s actually managed, plus he was a member of the backroom staff during two comparitively failing regimes at Old Trafford.

That’s not even taking into account that Giggs spent the vast majority of his playing career picking up trophies - he wouldn’t know a relegation dogfight if it bit him.

Leaving all that aside though, we’ll focus on the somewhat xenophobic attitude that foreign managers are coming over here, stealing all our coaches’ jobs. The argument, as it has been for a while since the influx of coaches from far off lands to English football, is that British managers aren’t being given the opportunities.

For a start, that’s wrong; there are plenty of British managers who have gone down to the lower leagues to ply their trade in the hope that they’ll make the step up.

To take the argument further, though, who really cares? This is no longer a British game for British people. The Premier League and as a consequence, the divisions below are an open invitation for anyone, within reason, to come along and apply for a job with they too probably hoping to better themselves and move up the pyramid having served their time elsewhere.

Closer to home, ‘going foreign’ as it appears to be known, has proven to be a fine decision. Look at the football Carlos Carvalhal has Wednesday playing and compare it to nice-but-a-little-boring Stuart Gray.

There are few managers from midway through the top flight down that you would swap Carvalhal with. And what about Sunday’s opponents Huddersfield? Do you think their fans could ever imagine they’d see what David Wagner has produced?

Football is a global game. Foreign coaches are here to stay. And if British coaches want a chance, maybe they should head off to different climes too.