DCSIMG

Tim aiming for a second British scalp

England's Junior Witter and USA's Timothy Bradley exchange punches during the WBC Light-Welterweight Title bout at Nottingham Arena. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Saturday May 10, 2008. See PA story BOXING Nottingham. Photo credit should read: Nick PottsX/PA Wire.

England's Junior Witter and USA's Timothy Bradley exchange punches during the WBC Light-Welterweight Title bout at Nottingham Arena. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Saturday May 10, 2008. See PA story BOXING Nottingham. Photo credit should read: Nick PottsX/PA Wire.

Timothy Bradley - the man who dethroned South Yorkshire WBC world champion Junior Witter three years ago- is targeting a showdown with Britain’s Amir Khan.

He wants to contest after adding the WBC light-welterweight title to his WBO crown with a technical decision victory over Devon Alexander in Detroit. Saturday’s much-anticipated unification contest came to an unsatisfactory close after one minute of round 10 when the American duo clashed heads - something that continually marred a scrappy contest - and Alexander recoiled in pain before being told by the ringside doctor that he was unfit to continue.

Bradley, who moved to 27-0 following the win, feels he has now proved himself to be the best in the world at his weight class, but admits victory over WBA 140-pound king Khan might be the only way to solidify that reputation.

“I think I proved that I’m a force to be reckoned with,” said 27-year-old Bradley. “I proved I’m the best at 140 in the world. I think I’ve got to take out Amir Khan next and then there’s no doubt that I’m the best 140-pound fighter in the world.”

Khan is currently without an opponent for his next proposed title defence in the UK on April 16 after negotiations with Northern Ireland’s European champion Paul McCloskey fell through this week.

Speaking as part of Sky Sports’ coverage of the Bradley-Alexander bout, Khan insisted a showdown with the Palm Springs fighter was on his agenda for the summer.

Khan said: “Get the April fight out of the way then in the summer we can fight with Bradley. He did say he’ll come to England so what a great fight that would be for the British fans.

“Bradley does tend to lunge in with his head, so when I fight him I’ll be watching his head.”

Accusations of rough-house tactics from Bradley were at the centre of the post-fight analysis. A key moment came in round three when a short left hook on the break from Bradley, followed by a head clash, opened up a troublesome cut above Alexander’s right eye.

The heads of both fighters frequently came together for the rest of the contest and as they each wound up big right hands in the 10th, a final heavy collision ended Alexander’s participation.

“These things happen,” Bradley explained. “I’m in the ring to win. I’m ruthless, I’m reckless. It’s a street fight. Alexander is a great warrior and I didn’t want the fight to end that way.”

 

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