Sheffield boxing: Vegan Lee is hungry for more wins

Lee Connelly with Robbie Sivyer and Nick Slice

Lee Connelly with Robbie Sivyer and Nick Slice

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Lee Connelly believes his new vegan diet has will help him super-charge what was a faltering career.

For the past few months, the Sheffield boxer has been eating a plant-based diet only. And it’s not done him any harm - he chalked up only his second win in 16 fights on Friday as an away fighter in Manchester.

The 28-year-old beat Ross Jameson, 27, in a four-round super-lightweight contest. Connelly, whose fiancée and two and a half year son are also vegan, said: “The fight was against a strong aggressive boxer who was three pounds heavier, so I was trying to box a bit more. After two rounds and him tiring I picked up the pace and boxed on the inside more and made sure I took the last two rounds, landing some great shots in the last.

“I have been vegan for about six months, I looked into it a while ago because animal products have long term health affects like cancer and heart disease, but I didn’t stick to it and now I do because I have seen what the animals go through and how cruel the industry is. I wasn’t a vegetarian before so had to cut out meat, dairy and eggs.

“I feel fantastic on a vegan diet and think it’s the future for all athletes and for anybody that wants to be heathy, the only disadvantage is sometimes going out to eat there is not many options but there are so many advantages for me the planet and the animals” said Connelly, who has been in winning fighters such as Luke Campbell, Atif Shafiq and Glenn Foot.

“The win has given me a boost in confidence, and the plan is win the next one and then look at doing more local show in November and be in the home corner for once. A while ago, I switched trainers for something new and fresh because I wasn’t getting much sparring and was getting a bit lazy, looks like a good place for me so far with (Chesterfield’s) Robbie Sivyer.”

The Westfield warrior (W5 L20 D1) is often asked by other boxers how he gets enough protein in his body to sustain training and competition needs. “That’s one of the most common questions I get and it comes from a general lack of understand about nutrition... plus everybody is told they need meat for protein” he said.

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