BOXING: Curtis ko against ‘man who punches like a mule’

Knocked out: Curtis Woodhouse, right, in action with Dale Miles.
Knocked out: Curtis Woodhouse, right, in action with Dale Miles.
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A regretful Curtis Woodhouse is hopeful that his and Dale Miles’ paths will cross again.

The former Blade had been doing well against Miles. Woodhouse was landing flush in the third round and twice rocked him with left, right combinations but Miles’ greater presence and punch power swang the fight in his favour.

Miles’ finish, in the fifth, was devestating and neither those in attendance and crucially Woodhouse saw it coming. A sweet right hook on the blindside caught him clean on the chin and a dazed Woodhouse was sent crashing to the canvas with a thud.

“He punches like a mule. Every time he landed it shook me to my boots,” said a crestfallen Woodhouse afterwards.

“I was winning the fight. I hurt him and I walked onto a hook and the lights went out. I didn’t even realise I had been down and I’m told I was for eight seconds so the referee made the right decision because I must’ve been pretty hurt.

“In a shootout like that somebody has to go and unfortunately it was me. I thought I had him. I was hurting him and I moved in for the kill and he nailed me and that was all she wrote.”

Miles and Woodhouse exchanged friendly words afterwards and should the Alfreton man now win his British title shot against Darren Hamilton, he’s offered to defend it against Woodhouse, in what would be his dream fight.

“He says that his first defence will be against me. He also said that I had him gone and he had to take me out with a desperation shot,” continued Woodhouse.

“I’m a lot of things but I’m not a quitter and I’m still going to try to become British champion.”

After a three week rest, trainer Mick Bromby is going to take Woodhouse through the re-building process.

“This kid (Miles) will beat Hamilton, win the British title and then we’ll go again,” said Bromby.

“He boxed some lovely stuff in there and proved that he deserves to be at the top. We’ll rest him then take him through the fight. I think the crowd may have had an effect on him and caused him to rush in too much. But it was a great performance and we’ll come back better next time.”

Woodhouse did go to hospital after the fight but was released shorty afterwards with a fractured cheekbone.

On the undercard, hometown light-middleweight Navid Mansouri returned in style after a 14 month absence.

Mansouri’s benefitted from recent sparring with Italian-New Yorker world champion Paulie Malignaggi and he forced a stoppage win over Nathan Graham. In a lively encounter, Mansouri twice sent Graham reeling before referee John Latham waved in during the sixth and final round.

Karl Bell, Chad Gaynor and Jerome Wilson all recorded routine points wins.

Swinton’s Tommy Cowardsuffered a narrow defeat in Stefy Bull’s promotion at Doncaster Dome. Bull had arranged for six fighters to face European opposition and all of them came through with wins.

But Coward tasted defeat for the first time and in the cruelest of ways. The welterweight had been cruising but was caught in the sixth by John Wayne Hibbert, who clawed back some points with a 10-8 round. This eventually cost Coward the win by a single point as Essex’s Hibbert pinched it 95-94.

“What a fight Tommy was in. He’s what I call a true fighter,” said Bull.