Towering NHS landmark

Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield'Mrs Anne Muller is one of the first patients to use the new body scanner at the hospital.  With her is Nurse Taryna Parker, and Radiographer Peter Memmott - 12th September 1985
Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield'Mrs Anne Muller is one of the first patients to use the new body scanner at the hospital. With her is Nurse Taryna Parker, and Radiographer Peter Memmott - 12th September 1985
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This hospital, which towers over Glossop Road at the edge of the city centre, has been fully open since 1978, although its history goes back further than that.

A decision was taken back in 1938 to build a new teaching hospital on Glossop Road and a Million Pound Appeal Fund was launched to help pay for the project in those pre-NHS days.

A competition was held to find architects for the scheme. The first phase was originally intended to include a Central Radium Institute, a dental department, which Sir Charles Clifford had left a bequest for, premises for the Edgar Allen Institute for industrial accident victims, which had outgrown its own site, and an orthopaedic department.

The Hallamshire Hospital out-patients department was opened in two phases, in 1961 and 1969, and ran eight purpose-built clinics for general surgery, general medicine, ear, nose and throat surgery, psychiatry, dermatology, ophthalmology and urology.

There were also laboratories and a large X-ray department on the site.

In the mid-1960s the NHS recognised that the old Royal Hospital needed to be replaced by a bigger and more modern facility, so plans began to be put in place to expand the Hallamshire.

By 1975 it had one of the busiest out-patients departments in the country, holding 202 clinics per week and providing two-thirds of out-patient facilities for the city.

The main building, comprising wards with around 700 beds and various departments, was completed in 1978.

The Prince of Wales visited the hospital for its official opening in November 1979. His grandmother, the Queen Mother, had unveiled a foundation stone back in May 1958.

Sheffield Medical School, which had been set up in Surrey Street and then moved to buildings in Leopold Street, was opened in new premises on the hospital site in autumn 1973.

In the first intake 150 students began their studies.

Despite protests, the decision was taken in the 1990s to centralise accident and emergency services at the Northern General, leaving the Hallamshire with a minor injuries service, although there is still a specialist A&E service for eye injuries at the hospital.

A major later addition to the site took place in 2001 when the old Jessop Hospital for Women closed.

The Jessop Wing was opened at the Royal Hallamshire, bringing together fertility, gynaecological and neonatal services.