Sam’s first Diary for the Star

Breast cancer sufferer Sam Turner is having a double masectomy and is to write a weekly diary in the paper on how she copes throughout
Breast cancer sufferer Sam Turner is having a double masectomy and is to write a weekly diary in the paper on how she copes throughout
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Sam Turner survived breast cancer and will be undertaking a double mastectomy in July in a bid to avoid suffering the genetic disease again.

Sam, from Mosborough, is writing a weekly diary for The Star – hoping to challenge the many misconceptions people have about women who willingly opt to have a double mastectomy, make the journey easier for others and do all she can in the fight to change the future for the daughters of all those with the BRCA gene:

Here is her first instalment:

“We have just returned for an amazing week’s holiday in the sun.

“As I’m laid by the pool my mind goes back to my operation but this time I’m thinking about the nice new bikinis I will be able to buy and also hoping that when I lay down to sunbathe I won’t lose my boobs under my arms! That’s got to be a positive of what I’m about to go through.

“I’m focusing on all the positives now. I have always tried to do this throughout my treatment and it has worked so far although I’ve had my bad times.

“My amazing family and friends have got me through and we’ve found something to laugh about so I don’t see why this should be any different.

“I think it’s because I’ve had more time to think about it whereas before because I needed to fight the cancer and had so many tests I never really had time to sit and worry about it much.

“I’m looking through a magazine and see an interview and pictures of Angelina Jolie – she looks fab, wonder if I will look that good after my op!

“We are now back from holiday and I have told my daughter Emma that I’m going in hospital.

“I just explained to her that to stop mummy getting very poorly again I need to go in hospital for a few nights and I will be sore when I come home and I will need her to look after me for a while.

“She really liked the sound of being able to help and wasn’t too worried about me going in.

“I told her that she would be able to visit and talk on the phone and that friends and family will make sure she gets to all her out of school activities as normal.

“I’m going to keep giving her a bit more information every few days and made sure that she knows she can ask any questions.

“I feel loads better now that Emma knows and that she didn’t seem too upset.”