Retro: Sheffield’s long-lost pubs

Retro Dus Tha Fancy a Pint? feature: Norfolk Hotel
Retro Dus Tha Fancy a Pint? feature: Norfolk Hotel
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Regular Retro contributor Vin Malone, who writes the weekly What Thi Ell’s That? feature, is beginning a new occasional series today, called Dus Tha Fancy a Pint?

It’s been prompted by the popularity of any mentions of long-lost Sheffield pubs in his articles. This week he’s looking at some of the pubs that have disappeared from the city centre.

Retro Dus Tha Fancy a Pint? feature: The Manchester

Retro Dus Tha Fancy a Pint? feature: The Manchester

These lost pubs ran from Barkers Pool when Fargate met Balm Green and up to Devonshire Street.

As you walk from Balm Green, the first pub on your left was the Norfolk Hotel on the corner, opened in 1871 and closed in 1898.

Norfolk Hotel

The Norfolk Hotel on the corner of Balm Green and Barkers Pool. The landlord’s name can be seen – a Mr Henry Darcy.

Retro Dus Tha Fancy a Pint? feature: The Foresters

Retro Dus Tha Fancy a Pint? feature: The Foresters

Just a short step up from the Norfolk Hotel stood the White Lion, opened in 1774 and closed 1924.

White Lion Hotel

The White Lion ready for demolition in 1924 making ready for the War Memorial soon to be erected in 1928

On the left just before Cambridge Street stood the Yellow Lion opened in 1736 and closed in 1863.

Retro Dus Tha Fancy a Pint? feature: Prince of Wales

Retro Dus Tha Fancy a Pint? feature: Prince of Wales

Just across on the corner stood the Albert opened in 1797 and closed in 1970s.

On the right, just before what is now Lloyds, stood the Manchester, opened in 1839 and closed in 1948?

The Manchester

Here’s The Manchester on the corner, next door is the Original John Bull with the Albert just showing at the top of Cambridge Street.

Next to the Manchester stood the Original John Bull, opened in 1846 and closed in an unknown year.

Further on Division St on the left near to Rockingham Lane stood the Dolphin Hotel, opened in 1845 and closed in the 1900s?

Just on the corner of Rockingham Lane on the right stood the Yorkshire Stingo, opened in 1833 and closed in 1925, Stingo is an old name for a Yorkshire Barley Wine.

Yorkshire Stingo

The Yorkshire Stingo can just be seen in front of the five ladies and children in white in the centre of the photograph. Stingo was an old Yorkshire word for strong barley wine.

On the corner of Rockingham Street stood the Foresters, opened in 1828 and still open, albeit with another crazy name.

Foresters

The Foresters can be seen on the corner of Rockingham Street with the White Lion on the opposite corner.

On the opposite corner, still on the left stood another White Lion, opened in 1859 and closed in the 1950s.

Just a little way on, still on the left on the corner of Canning Street, stood the Mansfield Hotel.

On the right-hand side of Division Street at the junction of Westfield Terrace stood the Prince of Wales. Opened in 1854, this pub still stands but in 1982 it was given a makeover and another silly name, the Frog & Parrot.

Prince Of Wales

The Prince Of Wales, with its distinctive yellow tiled frontage with an orange trim running around it, is now the Frog & Parrot.

Between Westfield Terrace and Eldon Street on the left-hand side of Division Street stood the David & Goliath, opened in 1840 and closed in an unknown year.

Walking towards the end of our tour of lost pubs, the final one, which was on the corner of Eldon Street and Devonshire Street, was The Reindeer, opened in 1841 and closed around 1942.

The closing dates of these lost pubs I cannot verify, so if anyone has a closing year of any of them please get in touch.

I would like to thank Sheffield History Forum and Mr W A Banks, writer of A Pub On Every Corner. Without them I couldn’t have written this article.