RETRO: Remembering Sheffield expeditions from bygone age

British Alaska expedition to Mount Dickey - 21st June 1980. 'Left to right: Keith Myhill of Stocksbridge, John Hardwick of Eckington, John Yates of Manchester and Bob Togood of Hillsborough.
British Alaska expedition to Mount Dickey - 21st June 1980. 'Left to right: Keith Myhill of Stocksbridge, John Hardwick of Eckington, John Yates of Manchester and Bob Togood of Hillsborough.
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SOME of us like a week somewhere hot never too far away from a drink of something cold. Others like city breaks and cultural offerings.

But for some souls, a trip away is best when it offers the chance for some serious adventure.

Yorkshire Himalayan Expedition 1971 - 'The Ogre'

Yorkshire Himalayan Expedition 1971 - 'The Ogre'

Down the decades The Star has reported on hundreds of Sheffielder’s packing up, and preparing to push body and soul to their limits, as they go out to explore the world.

Now, today, Tuesday Retro continues our A-Z of hobbies enjoyed in the region with X is for...eXpeditions.

What do you mean ‘it doesn’t begin with X’? Try finding a hobby that does! Answers on a postcard perhaps?

Either way, one thing’s for sure: if there’s a bit of the planet that’s not all that easily accessible, you can bet a group of Sheffielders - Scouts, students, lads on Stag do’s - have tried to access it. And these pictures pulled from The Star’s archives - are the proof.

Yorkshire Himalayan Expedition 1971 - 'The Ogre''Wives of members of the expedition pictured at the home of Mrs Pamela Morrison of Cherry Bank Road, Sheffield.'left to right: Mrs Pamela Morrison, Mrs Jan Gregory, Mrs Stephanie Rowland and Mrs Sheila Rousseau.

Yorkshire Himalayan Expedition 1971 - 'The Ogre''Wives of members of the expedition pictured at the home of Mrs Pamela Morrison of Cherry Bank Road, Sheffield.'left to right: Mrs Pamela Morrison, Mrs Jan Gregory, Mrs Stephanie Rowland and Mrs Sheila Rousseau.

They show city-folk preparing - and on - trips to the Himalayas (1971), Alaska (1980) and the Arctic (1982 and 1986).

“There’s nothing more exciting than going on an expedition,” says Matt Heason, an adventure sports obsessive and the man behind the city’s Cliffhanger Festival, who’s been on plenty himself. “It’s that getting put your comfort zone which provides the buzz; that idea that you’re doing something that maybe no-one’s done before, you’re making footprints in the snow or the sand where there have never been any before. That’s a pretty amazing feeling.

“The world’s a pretty crowded place these days and it’s good to get away from mobile phones and TV screens and juts go and take your self somewhere and meet a challenge head on.”

The 41-year-old, of Grindleford, who runs Heason Events, most fondly remembers a trip to Greenland in 2002. He spent four weeks climbing granite rock faces that had never been done before.

“The whole experience was amazing,” he says. “From the journey there to the actual month of climbing. You just don’t get those kind of thrills on a package holiday.”