Retro: Kings and steel barons

Dore and Totley Railway Station - 28th November 1970
Dore and Totley Railway Station - 28th November 1970
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This week brings us to Dore, the next stop on our alphabetical journey through Sheffield’s rich history.

The name Dore derives from the same Old English origin as door, signifying a gateway or passage between two kingdoms. The village can trace its recorded history back further than the city of Sheffield itself.

Bushey Wood, Dore, Sheffield - mid 19th century

Bushey Wood, Dore, Sheffield - mid 19th century

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle includes the earliest written record of Dore which is traced back to 829, according to the Dore Village Society. King Ecbert of Wessex led his army to the village to receive the submission of King Eanred of Northumbria, thereby establishing his rule over the whole of Anglo-Saxon Britain

A gritstone monolith with a black granite plaque commemorates the event, linking Dore to its royal past.

The monument was unveiled to 4,000 spectators by the Lord Mayor of Sheffield, Patience Sheard, in July 1968.

She told the crowd: “The stone at this village green has been made possible by the enterprise of the people who live here.

The King Ecgbert Memorial at Dore, Sheffield

The King Ecgbert Memorial at Dore, Sheffield

“Now we have recorded forever the most important single event in the development of the English-speaking race.”

Dore was at the heart of the Industrial Revolution. The earliest records of water-powered metal smelting come from the area.

The conversion to industry was a gradual process, many residents working part of the year on farms whilst being employed in other occupations such as scythe-smiths and saw makers.

The village, which was part of Derbyshire until boundary changes moved it into Sheffield in 1934, was a series of buildings linked by muddy tracks until the passing of the Dore Enclosure Act in 1822. The act saw straight roads and boundaries creating something closer resembling the Dore of today.

The Brasserie, High Street, Dore  - 23rd May 1989

The Brasserie, High Street, Dore - 23rd May 1989

In the late 19th century, the face of Dore was altered inextricably with the coming of the railroads. A small, predominantly impoverished village started to become a haunt for the middle classes.

Owners and managers of Sheffield factories quickly realised they could live outside of the smog and gloom of the city, travelling in by train from the newly-built Dore and Totley railway station.

When coal and steam began to provide a more reliable source of power, industry gradually moved east towards central Sheffield. Fortunately for Dore, it retained a thriving coal and ganister mining industry up until the Second World War.

By this point, the village’s standing was such that even a decline in industry did not tarnish its reputation as a semi-rural haven and its population continued to increase over the remainder of the century.

Dore Post Office 'c1982

Dore Post Office 'c1982

In recent years the village has boasted ex-football stars as residents, including Chris Waddle and Dave Bassett, and has all the modern amenities of a prosperous community.

Dore Male Voice Choir - 10th May 1990

Dore Male Voice Choir - 10th May 1990