Baking some real treats

E.C. Bell Bakery, Abbeydale Road, Sheffield'Picture shows hot x buns in preparation for Good Friday - 13th April 1949
E.C. Bell Bakery, Abbeydale Road, Sheffield'Picture shows hot x buns in preparation for Good Friday - 13th April 1949
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You can almost still smell that fresh baked aroma from our city bakeries.

Yet, as with all industries, technology has brought changes.

These girls, trainees in a cookery class for WRAC's at the Queen Elizabeth Barracks, Guildford, Surrey, are really learning about the handling of dough'Left to right Privates: Katherine Airey of Yorkshire, Joyce Bowen of Surrey, May Cumberland of Leeds and Katherine Daly of Donegal'7th February 1955

These girls, trainees in a cookery class for WRAC's at the Queen Elizabeth Barracks, Guildford, Surrey, are really learning about the handling of dough'Left to right Privates: Katherine Airey of Yorkshire, Joyce Bowen of Surrey, May Cumberland of Leeds and Katherine Daly of Donegal'7th February 1955

Here is The Star’s 1967 report on the greatest thing since sliced bread:

It is not the first time that bread has been associated with tigers.

In the rowdy days of Republican Rome, 2,000 years ago, the citizens required only two things to keep them happy, according to the poet Juvenal - bread and circuses.

Bread to feed their bellies on, and circuses - the more bloody, brutal and barbarous, the better - to feast their depraved eyes on.

While Romans ate their bread, tigers ate Romans.

Now the tiger is with us again - and not only in our tanks.

Pigeons, ducks, swans, and all manner of living creature that doth fawn on uneaten bread, beware. For the day of the unused, or half-used loaf, is past.

Never more need those curled-up crusts haunt the shelves of your larders, or lie unwanted in your breadbins.

‘Tiger’ bagged bread - the latest line in keep-fresh sliced bread - has arrived.

You simply take out the slices required, then seal the bag by twisting and tying, and it’s as good as if never opened.

It costs one shilling, and together with ‘Top-Taste’ bagged bread, and 48 other varieties of bread, is supplied in Sheffield by Newbould’s (Sheffield) Ltd, a subsidiary of Associated British Foods Ltd.

‘It is a question of helping the housewife to keep her bread as fresh as possible,’ said Mr Richard Hanson, director and general manager of Newbould’s (Sheffield).

Newbould’s have just spent £400,000 on new buildings and equipment for their premises in Penistone Road, Owlerton.

About 450 people will staff the new bakery which produces 4,000 baked loaves an hour.

Gone is the mixing-bowl; gone too are the men one used to see on one’s school expeditions to the bakery, kneading, twisting and shaping the bread by hand.

Machines do it all now, and all that remains for man is to press buttons, check for taste and texture, and supervise.