Manchester bombing survivor from Sheffield pays tribute to victims with special photo shoot

Amelia Thompson in the Manchester attack tribute photo created by Imelda Bell
Amelia Thompson in the Manchester attack tribute photo created by Imelda Bell
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A Sheffield schoolgirl who survived the Manchester bombing has paid tribute to the victims in an emotional photo shoot.

Amelia Thompson was not injured in the terror attack but has been left badly traumatised, having screamed so much that night that she damaged her vocal cords.

Amelia with her friend Ruby Crookes Carr, whom she met on the night of the terror attack

Amelia with her friend Ruby Crookes Carr, whom she met on the night of the terror attack

The 12-year-old from Dronfield, just outside Sheffield, was chosen to receive a free photo shoot in recognition of what she has endured.

She used the opportunity to pay her respects to the 22 people killed in the attack on May 22, including Sheffield woman Kelly Brewster.

In the photo, she poses with a lantern, surrounded by candles representing each of those who died.

Amelia's mum Lisa Newton said relatives of some of the bombing victims had been in touch to say how moved they were by the photo, and to request a copy.

"When I told Amelia she'd been chosen to receive a free photo shoot she immediately asked 'can we do something for the victims of the Manchester attack?'" said Lisa.

"I'm really proud of her because she's been struggling so much since the attack and this wasn't easy for her but it's something she felt she needed to do.

"The finished photo is absolutely breathtaking, and when Amelia first saw it she was in tears because it meant so much to her."

Amelia had lost her uncle to cancer and her father Wayne had had two heart attacks before the night of the bombing.

The Star reported in June how a special bond with another girl she met at the Ariana Grande concert that evening had helped Amelia come to terms with her trauma, but Lisa said her daughter was still not herself, having grown isolated and lost weight.

The image was created by Imelda Bell, who superimposed the candles and the bee, which has become a symbol of hope for those affected by the bombing.

The 47-year-old photographer, whose 'Every Child Is Beautiful' campaign provides a free photo shoot each month to the most deserving applicant, said the lantern represents hope after the 'darkness' of the tragedy.

Amelia and her mum travelled all the way down to Kent for the photo shoot last Wednesday.

Imelda said: "Photography for me is about making people happy, and I wanted Amelia to have the chance to be a normal girl and forget about her anxieties for a little while.

"I was really touched that she chose to use the photo shoot to do something for others affected by the tragedy."