Are you taking the mickey? Sheffield cricket club considers weeing on ground to deter pesky badgers

Damage caused by badgers at Parkhead Cricket Club
Damage caused by badgers at Parkhead Cricket Club
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Exasperated cricketers in Sheffield are considering drastic action to stop badgers tearing up their ground - weeing on the outfield!

Badgers have been wreaking havoc at Parkhead Cricket Club,on Ecclesall Road South, which prides itself on having one of the city's most picturesque grounds.

Parkhead Cricket Club prides itself on having one of Sheffield's most picturesque grounds

Parkhead Cricket Club prides itself on having one of Sheffield's most picturesque grounds

They have already tried various measures to keep out the nocturnal visitors, who they claim have left patches resembling a 'battlefield', including bolstering the fencing and using a high-pitched sonic deterrent.

Their last resort, should those methods fail, is to sprinkle urine around the ground to scare away the destructive intruders.

A spokesman for the club said: "Someone rang up and told us badgers are marking their territory at this time of year and if you get people to wee around the access points the smell frightens them off.

"We've been joking about putting buckets outside the pub and asking people to wee in them rather than using the toilets, but whether we'll pursue that tactic I don't know."

The club says using human urine is a last resort

The club says using human urine is a last resort

The club believes a profusion of worms this autumn has been attracting the badgers to come out of the woods and tear up the turf with their powerful claws in search of their prey.

Badgers are a protected species, meaning it is illegal to trap or harm them, or to interfere with their setts in any way.

There are no legal chemical treatments to deter them either, though some gardeners swear by chopped chillies or human urine.

The Badgers Trust recommends using solid or electric fencing, or ultrasonic devices, to keep creatures off your lawn.

The club, which competes in the Yorkshire & Derbyshire Cricket League, is keen to hear any other suggestions on how to deal with the problem.

Although the cricket season is over, the ground is still being used by the Sheffield U3A (University of the Third Age) Croquet Group, and the club fears the damage will be time-consuming and possibly costly to repair.

A club spokesman added: "This is one of the best grounds in the district, but it's being torn to shreds by these damn creatures. It's looking like a battlefield."