Find a place for this war monument

Picture shows the statue in the Botanical Gardens, Sheffield, in memory of those who fell inthe Crimea.
The statue was paid for by public subscription in 1863.  Recently vandals broke off one of the hands, but yesterday, 23 March 1982, the hand was put back by workmen.
Picture shows the statue in the Botanical Gardens, Sheffield, in memory of those who fell inthe Crimea. The statue was paid for by public subscription in 1863. Recently vandals broke off one of the hands, but yesterday, 23 March 1982, the hand was put back by workmen.
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Have your say

It is good to see that the Sheffield Civic Trust is running a series of workshops to encourage people to play their part in conserving the city’s memorials to the First World War.

They are working in partnership with other organisations, including the city council, to make sure that by 2018 all the city’s memorials are properly recorded and in good condition.

Everyone will want to support this initiative. But it does prompt me to ask why, if the city council can put time and energy into it, they still do nothing about Sheffield’s Crimean War Memorial, which has languished in a council depot since its removal from the Botanical Gardens in 2004.

At that time the council gave itself planning permission to remove the memorial – a permission which also required it to re-erect it in Barker’s Pool, or in a nearby civic or public space, within two years.

Ten years on, nothing has been done to give the memorial back to the city.

This is a monument of great importance; it was paid for by the people of Sheffield and was the first to commemorate, not a general or an aristocrat but the ordinary soldiers of the town who gave their lives for their country.

Their sacrifice is no less worthy of commemoration than that of the dead of WW1.

The Victorian Society has offered to work with the council to find the necessary funding for restoration, but to little avail.

With the imminent arrival – we hope – of the retail quarter there could hardly be a better time to find a place for this monument in the centre of Sheffield, where it belongs.

Valerie Bayliss

Chair, S Yorks Group, The Victorian Society