A tale of two MPs

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How refreshing to hear from a local Labour MP who has acceded to the wishes of the majority electorate in voting to trigger Article 50 to begin the process of leaving the European Union. (Paul Blomfield, The Star, January 14, 2017). Not only this, he has also publicly responded in a fair and reasoned manner to one of his detractors, Carol Sykes, who had taken him to task by being appalled to see his name on the list of MPs voting in favour.

Compare Mr Blomfield’s response to the non-existent one of Angela Smith, another Sheffield Labour MP.

Ms Smith has the dubious honour of being named in the national press as one of the top five Labour MPs, based on a 61 per cent constituency vote, who voted against the wishes of their constituents by failing to support triggering Article 50.

Her failure to respond to subsequent constructive criticism in asking her to justify her/party decision rather than her constituents, poses the question – has she no defence for her selfish action?

I particularly commend Paul Blomfield for his honesty in admitting that no one voted on June 23 in the belief that Parliament would override the result and it would undermine democracy if we did.

The public were never made aware that the vote was an advisory one and that MPs could vote against the majority wish of the people if they wanted to. They voted to leave and expect Parliament to honour their decision – ceded to them in the belief that the majority vote would be binding on all parties.

I can understand Paul’s worries about the Prime Minister’s reluctance to reveal her negotiating hand before the Brexit process begins. Ask yourself the question – would the other 27 EU members reveal in advance their plans to the UK if the boot were on the other foot?

Mrs May has now agreed to present further details of her Brexit plan to Parliament. I sincerely hope that MPs will not wish to know every detail of her negotiating strategy in advance of her EU meeting.

I believe that every right- minded MP in Parliament should treat our European allies as partners to rely on each other. However, relying on each other is far different from our being ruled by the diktats of 27 other EU members, with consequent loss of our national sovereignty, uncontrolled migration, and resulting economic strain on our economy and infrastructure.

By all means hold the Government to account Paul. As an opposition MP this is a prime duty in Parliament. The current Labour MPs are woefully unable to do so, due to in-fighting within party ranks, and an unelectable leader as a future Prime Minister.

I have voted Labour for the past 60 years, I regret that I am unable to continue doing so until the Party puts its house in order, listens to the grassroots electorate, and as a once-great Party, again becomes appealing and electable to the people.

Cyril Olsen

Busk Meadow, S5