Work under way to repair ‘Leaning Spire of Sheffield’

Work has started on the leaning tower at the Cathedral Church of St Marie, Norfolk Street. Picture: Andrew Roe
Work has started on the leaning tower at the Cathedral Church of St Marie, Norfolk Street. Picture: Andrew Roe
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Work has started on repairing the “leaning spire” of Sheffield at a city cathedral.

Scaffolding has gone up around the Cathedral Church of St Marie, in the city centre, as work begins to correct the building’s ancient spire.

Work has started on the leaning tower at the Cathedral Church of St Marie, Norfolk Street. Picture: Andrew Roe

Work has started on the leaning tower at the Cathedral Church of St Marie, Norfolk Street. Picture: Andrew Roe

Worshippers had their prayers answered last year after the government agreed to provide £270,000 to fund the repairs.

Work is expected to be finished in April.

Cathedral Dean Father Christopher Posluszny said people will not see very much difference in the look of the building when the repairs are finished, but the danger of a potential collapse of part of the tower would now be dealt with.

Wrought-iron rings that had been holding the structure together had started to corrode and further measurements revealed the spire was leaning more than previously thought.

Father Christopher said there has been little disruption caused by the work so far, with the cathedral church still open as normal.

The cathedral dates from 1850 and underwent substantial renovations between September 2011and November 2012.

Father Christopher said he hoped this latest work will be the last for generations.

Money has been granted through the government’s First World War Centenary Cathedral Repair Fund, which handed out more than £8 million to 31 cathedrals in the funding round St Marie’s qualified for.

It qualified as it is planning a series of commemoration events to mark its links with the First World War .

The government fund was set up in April last year in recognition of cathedrals being a symbol of Britain’s shared history, as well as the significant role they will play throughout the commemorations of the centenary of the First World War.