Work under way on pond improvements in Sheffield

Dredging the overgrown pond, the spoil is dropped on the banks to allow pond life to return to the water
Dredging the overgrown pond, the spoil is dropped on the banks to allow pond life to return to the water
0
Have your say

Ponds at two Sheffield nature reserves have been given some tender loving care to help encourage more wildlife.

Ponds at the Shire Brook Valley nature reserve in south east Sheffield, and the Woodhouse Washlands Yorkshire Wildlife Trust nature reserve at Woodhouse Mill, near Rotherham, underwent improvements.

Completed pond'Nathan Coughlan of "Frog Life" supervised the restoration of an existing pond and the creation of three new ponds on the Woodhouse Washlands Yorkshire Wildlife Trust Nature Reserve at Woodhouse Mill.

Completed pond'Nathan Coughlan of "Frog Life" supervised the restoration of an existing pond and the creation of three new ponds on the Woodhouse Washlands Yorkshire Wildlife Trust Nature Reserve at Woodhouse Mill.

At Shire Brook Valley, the overgrown ‘dipping pond’ was dredged thanks to a £1,500 grant for the Shire Brook Conservation Group from the South East Community Assembly.

The spoil was dropped on to the banks of the pond to allow any pond life which may have been disturbed to return to the water.

In Rainbow Meadow, at the same site, plans put together by the council’s ecology unit and ranger service finally got underway for the restoration, creation and management of new and existing ponds.

The existing pond there is choked with grass and restoration will increase the size of it from about 35 square metres to 110 to 150 square metres.

The sides will slope to a central depth of about one metre.

An additional pond of a similar shape and size will be created in the central area of the meadow.

Meanwhile at Woodhouse Mill, Nathan Coughlan of Frog Life supervised the restoration of an existing pond and the creation of three new ponds following a funding windfall from landfill sources.

The existing pond was dredged and the new ponds were created to improve and increase the available habitat for great crested newts, which have bred at the reserve for many years.

Due to the heavy rain and sodden ground, the spoil from the newly-created ponds was dropped nearby and will be moved to other parts of the site when ground conditions are better.