What to get the person who has everything

Pictured with all of the gifts for the Barnardo's Gift Appeal are, from front to back, Janet Hone, Linda O'Gorman, Madeleine Keyworth, chairman of RDaSH, and Liz James.
Pictured with all of the gifts for the Barnardo's Gift Appeal are, from front to back, Janet Hone, Linda O'Gorman, Madeleine Keyworth, chairman of RDaSH, and Liz James.
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Is it always the thought that counts?

Choosing presents for family and friends at Christmas can be a challenging task.

There’s the pressure of what to buy them, hoping they will like it, and hoping that they don’t already have it.

We all have that one friend who is impossible to buy for because they just seem to have everything.

Government ministers appeared to have that exact dilemma when the Queen became the first monarch to attend a cabinet meeting for more than 200 years on Tuesday. Their dilemma – what do you buy the woman who has everything?

Usually if someone pops in for a brief visit you might get them a Christmas card or a box of festive biscuits, but when it is the Queen you are buying for, suddenly a box of biscuits does not quite cut it.

To mark her visit to Downing Street, Cabinet ministers, including Sheffield MP and Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, clubbed together to buy her a set of 60 placemats, one for each year of her reign to thank her for decades of public service in her Diamond Jubilee year.

It has always been said that when it comes to buying presents it is the thought that counts, but just in case the placemats were not enough, the Cabinet announced part of Antarctica will be named Queen Elizabeth Land in her honour.

With Christmas six days away, Sheffield city centre is packed with people getting those last minute gifts.

The Star asked shoppers what they would be buying for those friends and relatives who already have everything they could want.

Andrea Innocent, aged 52, of High Green, was shopping for Christmas presents for her son.

She said: “I would probably get them something novelty. Maybe one of those onesies, or anything that’s just a bit of fun rather than something serious.”

Lorraine Hardy, 59, of Loxley, thought material gifts were no longer the way to go. She said: “I’d give them time, or something meaningful. Lots of material gifts don’t mean a lot any more.”

Her friend, Angela Farrall, 75, of Hillsborough agreed: “Most people I know aren’t even giving any cards any more. Placemats are a bit disappointing aren’t they, I’d give them a hug!”

Joan Streets, 74, of Bents Green, said: “Definitely time. I’d make a list with things that need doing like hedge cutting and window cleaning. As I get older that’s the sort of thing I’d like.”