We must stand tall in the face of hatred and division, says third-generation Sheffield woman

Shahd Salha, from Syria, and Sheffield woman Sabrina Eidaroos at the vigil for Manchester terror attack victims on Monday
Shahd Salha, from Syria, and Sheffield woman Sabrina Eidaroos at the vigil for Manchester terror attack victims on Monday
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A third-generation Sheffield muslim woman is pleading with her compatriots to stay solid after Monday's terrorist attack at Manchester Arena.

Sabrina Eidaroos said she was 'appalled' by the events of the attack which killed at least 22 people and left scores more injured after an Ariana Grande concert at the arena.

Miss Eidaroos, 25, said there was a danger the attack would be used to divide communities based on their beliefs.

The Shiregreen resident told The Star at today's vigil for the attack victims that it was vital this didn't happen.

"We don't want people to utilise this and point the finger at Muslims," she said.

"I'm disappointed. I'm a Muslim and these are not my beliefs."

Miss Eidaroos, a parent herself, put aside religion in recognising the horror of the attack.

"It's really sad," she said.

"Parents have lost their children," she said.

"I'm a parent, and I can understand what those parents are going through.

"This is so close to home. Where is it going to happen next?"

She was adamant Sheffield people could stick together in the fight against hatred.

"We are together here," Miss Eidaroos said.

Born and bred in Sheffield, Miss Eidaroos said she considered herself a 'Yorkshire lass'.

Her grandfather Abdullah Bobaker Taha was among the first generation of Yemenis to work worked in the steel industry in Sheffield in the 1960s.