We must live within means

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IT is time for a thorough and no-holds-barred inquiry into the finances at the trust running Sheffield’s museums.

It is currently before the council, cap in hand, waiting to be bailed out after running up debts totalling £1.7 million.

There are explanations. One is that the renovation of Weston Park Museum coincided with the credit crunch and rising fuel charges. But none of the explanations are an excuse for lumbering the city with the onerous obligation of writing off its debts.

This is not a situation which cropped up overnight. It has grown over a number of years. And the public has a right to know what was attempted to stop the debts mounting - and why the measures did not work.

It seems that the organisation had ideas above its station and wanted to produce a service which it simply could not afford. We all have to live within our means. And that goes for museums too.

Why was this not obvious before the debts had grown to such damaging proportions? And what is the plan for the future to ensure this organisation is no longer a drain on the public purse?

Economic answer blowing in the wind

IT seems that one of the answers on how this region will hoist itself out of the economic doldrums is blowing in the wind.

For it has been revealed that local engineering firms could be ideally placed to benefit from plans to build a multi-million pound plant to provide offshore wind turbines around the British coast.

This is because the company behind the project, Siemens Wind Power, has strong links with Sheffield and sees Hull as the main manufacturing base for the work.

That means Sheffield is in pole position to join this exciting enterprise.

We are confident that steps are already being taken to capitalise on these factors and look forward to reporting on developments in the near future.

Music to their ears

MUSIC is the food of love. It is also a feast of nostalgia for people suffering from dementia.

Local charity Lost Chord provides musicians to play concerts in care homes and day centres where dementia patients have been known to respond to familiar tunes in a more positive manner than to any other stimulus.

So it is good news to learn that the charity is to move to a new home, in Maltby, Rotherham.

This shows that the charity is secure in its future to continue its vital and much appreciated work.

Indeed, the new headquarters for the charity will allow it to develop even further the services it provides for dementia sufferers.

This is good news and we know that it will be music to the ears of clients.