VIDEO: UKIP leader Nigel Farage calls for people to vote in South Yorks PCC election

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UKIP leader Nigel Farage has called for South Yorkshire to vote for its next crime tsar - saying many people do not know what the election was about.

Mr Farage said he backed attempts to enthuse people to vote for the candidate they wanted, adding: “If you want change, don’t do nothing.”

UKIP leader Nigel Farage visited Sheffield on Monday (20 October 2014) to support the party's South Yorkshire Police and Crime Commissioner canidate Jack Clarkson. Our picture shows Mr Farage (right) and Mr Clarkson at National Emergency Services Museum, in West Bar, Sheffield.

UKIP leader Nigel Farage visited Sheffield on Monday (20 October 2014) to support the party's South Yorkshire Police and Crime Commissioner canidate Jack Clarkson. Our picture shows Mr Farage (right) and Mr Clarkson at National Emergency Services Museum, in West Bar, Sheffield.

Voter turnout at the region’s last PCC election was just 14.53 per cent.

Mr Farage added: “The truth of it is a lot of people aren’t really sure what the by-election is about. These PCC roles, I like them, I support them. It means people have a say. But it hasn’t sunk into everybody’s consciousness, so the problem is turnout.

“So what we’re trying to do, and I’m sure what The Star will try to do, is make people aware this election is happening and that it matters.”

Mr Wright stood down in the wake of the Rotherham child sex abuse revelations, and Mr Farage said the region’s ‘one-party state’ was ‘directly responsible’.

Asked how he would respond to claims UKIP was drawing racial battle lines for political gain, he said: “I’d resent it and reject it utterly, as would Amjad Bashir, our Muslim practising MEP.

“We have people across all faiths and communities in UKIP and supporting us, but something horrible went wrong in Rotherham. The problem was people were more fearful of being thought to be racist by highlighting the problem than doing the right thing.”

He said former policeman Coun Clarkson would not be ‘hide bound’ by political correctness’.

He added: “It’s interesting, people say, ‘How on Earth can a former policeman run for this role?’ The answer is there are several around the country and just because some things went wrong in the police force here doesn’t make them all bad apples. I think somebody who’s going into this job with a genuine passionate desire to see the police regain the kind of respect they used to have when he joined the force makes him the right man.”