VIDEO: ‘Jolly Lolly’ Alan gets into the groove at crossing

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A dancing lollipop man has proved he is The King of the road after his roadside gyrations proved a massive hit with school children.

Elvis fan Alan Filbee started getting into the groove on the roadside as a way to keep warm on cold mornings.

Picture shows Alan Filbee of Chesterfield, a dancing 43-year-old crossing patrol officer who can be seen dancing away on High Street, Old Whittington near Chesterfield in between helping youngsters across the busy stretch. Alan does not dance when showing children across the road, but once on the side of the road he dances and waves at passes by. 'See Ross Parry copy PRYLOLLIPOP'A dancing lollipop man is fast becoming known as one of the country's jolliest.'Dad Alan Filbee's roadside jives are always raising smiles among old and young.'What started as a way to warm up in the cold has fast made him a celebrity in his hometown of Old Whittington, Derbyshire and has earnt the 43-year-old the nickname "Jolly Lolly".'' rossparry.co.uk / Tom Maddick

Picture shows Alan Filbee of Chesterfield, a dancing 43-year-old crossing patrol officer who can be seen dancing away on High Street, Old Whittington near Chesterfield in between helping youngsters across the busy stretch. Alan does not dance when showing children across the road, but once on the side of the road he dances and waves at passes by. 'See Ross Parry copy PRYLOLLIPOP'A dancing lollipop man is fast becoming known as one of the country's jolliest.'Dad Alan Filbee's roadside jives are always raising smiles among old and young.'What started as a way to warm up in the cold has fast made him a celebrity in his hometown of Old Whittington, Derbyshire and has earnt the 43-year-old the nickname "Jolly Lolly".'' rossparry.co.uk / Tom Maddick

But his moves have fast made him a local hero and earned him the nickname ‘Jolly Lolly’.

The 43-year-old said: “It makes me feel good and hopefully it makes others feel good too. I love doing it.

“I don’t listen to any music but I start by making a noise to myself, like a do-do-do noise, and then I just start moving around.

“I just improvise. It depends how I am feeling that day.”

The dad-of-one’s dancing has gathered an unofficial fan club of schoolchildren and passing motorists who toot their horn as they drive past his crossing at Mary Swanwick Primary School in Old Whittington near Chesterfield.

Alan said: “I get people coming up to me and telling me I’ve made their day after seeing me dance. I love making people happy.

“If I get the adults and children across the road safely then I’ve done a good job and I might have a dance to celebrate.

“The best part of the job is getting the kids across safely, but if I can make people happy while I do it, that’s a bonus.”

He added: “If you wake up, it is going to be a good day.

“It doesn’t matter if it is cold or it is raining, you get up and make that day what you want it to be.”

A Derbyshire Council spokesman said: “It’s great to see the community has taken their school crossing patrol officer so much to heart.”

Alan, who also works in frozen food store Iceland, has an 18-year-old daughter, Chloe, who is at college studying art and design.

School crossing patrol wardens first appeared in America in the 1920s and reached the UK in 1945, when they were trialed in London.

Drivers failing to stop for a warden got a £5 fine in 1953. Today, you could be slammed with a £1,000 fine and three penalty points.

The familiar ‘lollipop’ sign was introduced in 1960 and is where lollipop men and women get their name.