VIDEO: Cancer patients to benefit from research program in Sheffield

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Sheffield's cancer patients will benefit from a multi-million pound research program to tackle the disease in South Yorkshire.

The Yorkshire Cancer Research charity will join forces with University of Sheffield and Sheffield Teaching Hospital's NHS Foundation Trust to improve cancer outcomes in the county.

Victor Fleming is receiving treatment for bladder cancer in Sheffield

Victor Fleming is receiving treatment for bladder cancer in Sheffield

Ten of the country's most promising cancer researchers and specialists will be based in Sheffield, costing £4.5 million.

They will undertake a five-year research programme which will bring the latest treatment and care innovations to patients.

It will focus on all stages of cancer care, from early diagnosis and treatment to quality of patients' lives.

They will also undertake ground-breaking clinical trials.

The launch of Yorkshire Cancer Research in partnership with the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Pictured are Dr Kathryn Scott, interim chief executive of the Yorkshire Cancer Research, Rob Coleman, Professor of Medical Oncology, University of Sheffield, Chris Newman, Faculty Director of Research & Innovation, University of Sheffield and Dr Jonathan Wadsley, Consultant Clinical Oncologist, Weston Park Hospital.

The launch of Yorkshire Cancer Research in partnership with the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Pictured are Dr Kathryn Scott, interim chief executive of the Yorkshire Cancer Research, Rob Coleman, Professor of Medical Oncology, University of Sheffield, Chris Newman, Faculty Director of Research & Innovation, University of Sheffield and Dr Jonathan Wadsley, Consultant Clinical Oncologist, Weston Park Hospital.

Professor Rob Coleman, from the University of Sheffield, will head the project. Professor Coleman said the patients would be the beneficiaries of the programme.

"This major investment by Yorkshire Cancer Research means that Sheffield can continue to pioneer new treatments to give cancer patients a brighter future," Professor Coleman said.

The university's Research and Innovation Faculty director, Chris Newman, was thrilled with the announcement.

His job is to help to set a strategic plan for the research. He was thrilled with the announcement.

"It truly is a special day for us," Mr Newman said.

"We can really work closely with the YCR."

While huge strides forward have been made in treatment of the disease, Mr Newman said there was "always room for improvement".

"We can't stand still," he said.

The researchers' appointments will "take us into the top league" of cancer research, according to Dr Jonathan Wadsley, a consultant clinical oncologist at Weston Park Hospital.

"Having this sort of investment makes a huge difference to patients who are looked after here every day," Dr Wadsley said.

Dr Wadlsey has been on the front line of cancer treatment in Sheffield for 12 years.

He has seen some huge strides forward in the survival rates of breast cancer, which is close to 80 per cent.

Fewer people survive lung and pancreatic cancers.

The Yorkshire Cancer Research's interim chief executive, Dr Kathryn Scott, thanked generous donors for making the programme happen.

More than half of the donations traditionally come from gifts in wills.

"People want to leave a mark for future generations," Dr Scott said.

By 2025, the charity aims to save 2000 more lives from the disease.

In Sheffield, 56 people are being diagnosed with cancer every week, Dr Scott said.

"That's about 11 every working day," she said.

Bladder cancer patient Victor Fleming also welcomed the news of the research programme.

"You can't go wrong," he said of possible breakthroughs in fighting the disease.

Mr Fleming receives treatment at Weston Park Hospital.

He is in his fifth of six chemotherapy cycles, and is being treated with other drugs to help break the cancer down.

Some of the injections take place at home in Barnsley.

Mr Fleming hoped the research would help future patients.

"The trial will provide information which is going to be some help for the drugs companies," Mr Fleming said.

He had nothing but praise for the staff at the hospital, who he has formed a bond with during his treatment.

"You get to know them as people, and as friends," Mr Fleming said.