VIDEO: Bee sculpture unveiled in Chesterfield during major campaign launch

0
Have your say

A wooden bee sculpture has been unveiled in Chesterfield at the start of a major campaign to highlight the plight of the insect.

The carving, designed by Wirksworth artist Andrew Frost, takes pride of place outside the Crooked Spire church.

Wood sculpture artist Andrew Frost and the Mayor and Mayoress of Chesterfield Alexis Diouf and Vickey-Anne Diouf with the sculpture. Picture by Brian Eyre.

Wood sculpture artist Andrew Frost and the Mayor and Mayoress of Chesterfield Alexis Diouf and Vickey-Anne Diouf with the sculpture. Picture by Brian Eyre.

It was revealed on Thursday morning as a three-year drive to help bees in the Peak District launched.

Wood sculpture Mr Frost, who uses chainsaws to transform abandoned trees into works of art, said he was “delighted” with the carving.

The oak sculpture sits atop the stump of a large tree which was blown down in strong winds last year.

Peter Corke, sustainability officer at Chesterfield Borough Council, said: “I’m thrilled with this piece of artwork which will raise awareness about bees and their plight.

“One in three mouthfuls of our food are thanks to bees and we can take action to help them – including by managing gardens and land in a pollinator-friendly way.”

Mr Corke said the borough council and various other organisations funded the sculpture.

The Pollinating the Peak initiative, which launched at the Winding Wheel, will encourage communities to create bee habitats and take part in a national recording scheme.

If successful, the campaign will be rolled out in other areas of the UK by the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, a charity dedicated to securing the future of the country’s bees.

Gill Perkins, of the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, said: “Bees keep us healthy by pollinating our fruit and vegetables – but they’re in trouble.

“Their populations have crashed, with some species already extinct and others threatened.

“We want to raise awareness about these iconic insects and how we can all help save the sound of summer.”