Turning to Botox to iron out those wrinkles

Martin Scattergood administering a Botox injection in the home of Sheffield cleaner Shelly Jackson
Martin Scattergood administering a Botox injection in the home of Sheffield cleaner Shelly Jackson
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SHEFFIELD is going Botox barmy.

Lunchtime treatments, cheaper cosmetic fillers and even DIY facial injection kits are being snapped up as image-conscious men and women turn to the needle to slow the ageing process.

Cleaners, builders and railwaymen - some barely in their mid-20s - are forking out thousands of pounds a year to iron out their wrinkles and get the celebrity look. “We all have our vices and Botox is mine,” said Sheffield University cleaner Shelly Jackson. If I found myself without the money for Botox...I’d find it somehow, I just would, it’s a priority for me.”

People in their 20s are jumping on the Hollywood-inspired bandwagon too.

“I use Botox preventatively because the idea of ageing terrifies me,” said 26-year-old Sheffield hairdresser Megan Knight, pictured left.

“As a hairdresser I’m always frowning in concentration and when you look at yourself in the mirror all day, you become very aware of your flaws.

“I hate the idea of getting older and if Botox can slow down the process and stop lines forming, I’ll pay out.”

Properly regulated treatments are safe and many claim their lives have been transformed by botox and fillers.

But one cosmetic practitioner is warning a new PIP-style scandal - where poor-quality silicone breast implants leaked into women’s bodies - could be about to break.

Cheryl Barton, practitioner at Aesthetika clinic in Sheffield said: “There are 250 types of filler solution on the market. In my opinion we don’t know enough about some of them.”

n Getting to the bottom of Botox: page 16.