Trip down memory lane for old and young in Sheffield

Monteney School,Parson X,is being used in a research project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council into playground activities past and present.Pictured is Dimitra Peistikou(left) a University of Sheffield Student in Education interviewing June Rains,whoese grandkids are pupils at the school about her own playground memories

Monteney School,Parson X,is being used in a research project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council into playground activities past and present.Pictured is Dimitra Peistikou(left) a University of Sheffield Student in Education interviewing June Rains,whoese grandkids are pupils at the school about her own playground memories

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YOUNGSTERS enjoyed hopscotch, skipping and spinning the hula hoop as a Sheffield primary took a nostalgic trip down memory lane.

The event at Monteney Primary at Parson Cross celebrated 60 years of playtime fun as part of a festival marking the launch of a special new research project.

Pupils welcomed their grandparents into school so they could talk about their very own playtimes in the 1950s and 60s.

The youngsters carried out interviews looking at their relatives’ favourite pastimes from the era and showcased films they have made themselves – projecting them on to the school walls.

Research into the history of play has been carried out by a team at Sheffield University, led by Professor Jackie Marsh and Dr Julia Bishop.

They have found that playtimes in Parson Cross are as vibrant today as they have ever been.

Characters like Little Miss Muffet, Jack and Jill and Incy Wincy Spider are featured in the team’s new Childhoods and Play website, packed with the intriguing history of children’s games, songs and nursery rhymes.

The project aims to develop an interactive archive, relating to the play traditions of children down the decades.

Eventually it will contain information contributed by more than 20,000 British youngsters like those at Monteney, as well as observations and sound recordings from world-renowned folklorists Iona and Peter Opie.

Professor Marsh said: “We are very excited by the launch of this project and we look forward to developing the resource in the years ahead.”

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