Terror brothers’ parents have ‘got away scot free’

Police continue to investigate the scene in the Brick Ponds area of Edlington, South Yorkshire where two young boys were found brutally attacked by two other boys aged 10 and 11 and are currently in a serious condition in hospital.''06/04/2009'Byline John Nguyen/Ross Parry Agency
Police continue to investigate the scene in the Brick Ponds area of Edlington, South Yorkshire where two young boys were found brutally attacked by two other boys aged 10 and 11 and are currently in a serious condition in hospital.''06/04/2009'Byline John Nguyen/Ross Parry Agency
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Community leaders are demanding to know why the parents of the boys guilty of the horrific Doncaster torture case have escaped scot-free.

South Yorkshire Police say there is ‘insufficient evidence’ to prosecute the couple whose sons were responsible for one of the county’s most notorious crimes, committed three years ago next week.

Despite evidence in a Serious Case Review that the boys, aged 10 and 11 at the time of the offences in Edlington, were victims of physical abuse themselves, there has been no further action.

Town councillor Georgina Mullis, who was mayor of Edlington at the time and was heavily involved in keeping the community together, says it is unfair only social workers have had to carry the can so far. The Serious Case Review report said one of the boys had been hit in the home, both were seen with bruises on their faces, and the older brother got drunk on vodka.

A GP also raised concerns with social services about multiple injuries and missed vaccinations. But neither of the parents has been prosecuted – and there are conflicting accounts as to why.

Coun Mullis told The Star: “I think the parents should take some form of responsibility for what their children have done. Those parents should be brought to book. They let the children run wild.”

A South Yorkshire Police spokesman said: “The force attended a number of matters relating to the family over a 14-year period. Following consultation with the Crown Prosecution Service it was decided no criminal proceedings would be initiated due to insufficient evidence.”

But a South Yorkshire CPS spokesman stated: “The CPS has not received a file from the police and has not provided the police with any charging advice.”

Meanwhile, lawyers for the victims have condemned ‘systemic failings’ that preceded the ‘predictable’ crimes.

Sonia Hume-Dawson, of Atteys Solicitors, said: “A catalogue of errors was made, with departments failing to communicate.”