Students’ tree-mendous work helps bring back elms

Planting trees in Parsons Cross is only the start of the adventure for these young people, who will be visiting Mboniselo Primary School in Port Elizabeth, South Africa later in February, for four weeks, in order to help create a school vegetable garden and plant fruit trees.
Planting trees in Parsons Cross is only the start of the adventure for these young people, who will be visiting Mboniselo Primary School in Port Elizabeth, South Africa later in February, for four weeks, in order to help create a school vegetable garden and plant fruit trees.
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ELM trees are making a comeback in Sheffield - nearly 40 years after they were lost to Dutch elm disease.

Seven new trees were planted in Parson Cross by youngsters from Chaucer Business and Enterprise College, joined by Coun Peter Price, chair of the north east community assembly.

Coun Price said: “Parson Cross neighbourhoods currently have the lowest tree cover in the city, and this money has been allocated in order to start addressing that. It’s also been great to meet all these young people.”

The students will be visiting a primary school in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, later this month, where they will plant more trees and help create a vegetable garden.

The Parson Cross estate was built in the 1930s on farmland. Many of the old fields’ names incorporated the word elm, while Elm Lane is still a main road in the area.

A virulent strain of Dutch elm disease arrived in Britain on a shipment of logs in around 1967. Since then, over 25 million trees have died from the condition in the UK.

New, disease-resistant varieties have now been developed.