Street sticks together for 50 years

Arnold Avenue. Valerie Hancock with Kathleen Fulbrook and some of the residents of Arnold Avenue. who have lived on the avenue for 50years.
Arnold Avenue. Valerie Hancock with Kathleen Fulbrook and some of the residents of Arnold Avenue. who have lived on the avenue for 50years.
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IN AN age where many people do not know their neighbour’s names, residents on one Sheffield street are putting everyone to shame.

For families living on Arnold Avenue, on the Charnock estate in Gleadless, are marking 50 years of lending a cup of sugar, watching their children grow up and sharing celebrations with each other.

The 12 couples left, who moved in as newlyweds, are now reaching their own golden wedding anniversaries in the Queen’s Jubilee year.

It is believed they may be Sheffield’s longest-serving neighbours.

Sylvia Green, aged 70, said: “We all moved into newly-built houses as young, married couples. Our children grew up together and we are all about the same age.

The former accounts manager, who lives with her husband Malcolm, 72, a former engineer, said: “We’ve been very happy to stay where we are.”

Grandmother Valerie Hancock, aged 72, who moved to the street with husband Robin in March 1962, said: “We’re still a friendly road, we’ve been involved with each other’s children and weddings.

“It is quite an achievement.”

A lot has happened since new houses on Arnold Avenue were snapped up by excited couples back in 1962.

The grocer’s van that brought supplies has been replaced by nearby shops, the children playing outside have their own youngsters now and everywhere else it seems neighbourly niceties have been swapped for social networking.

But through it all the families have remained side by side.

Former childcare assistant Valerie said some now holidayed and spent Christmas together.

She said: “I think definitely we will stay here.

“People do move a lot more now, we haven’t got any reason to.

“We’ve got the resources nearby with shops, a church and school five minutes away.”

In 2002, there were 72 of the original householders left when the neighbours- turned-friends celebrated 40 years together with a special party with revellers dressing up in 1950s and 1960s fashions.

This year, those remaining are hoping to highlight the occasion with another party.

But they still ponder the secret to a street sticking together this long.

Valerie said: “I think it’s because we all came in together when we were young couples starting our families.”