Spring Clean for Sheffield beauty spot

Good work: An apprentice clears the overgrown land and, inset, the bench is installed.'           PICTURES: STEVE TAYLOR.
Good work: An apprentice clears the overgrown land and, inset, the bench is installed.' PICTURES: STEVE TAYLOR.
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A BEAUTY spot was given a spruce up in time for spring with the help of green-fingered Sheffield apprentices.

Young horticulture students from Sheaf Training in Fir Vale joined forces with Sheffield Council’s ranger service to spread the Love Where you Live message.

Apprentices from Sheaf Training have been helping to clear up Parkwood Springs and installed a wooden seat alongside one of the footpaths though the wood. Ranger James Smith (right) and apprentices Mitchell Parker (left) and Daniel Barnes, both aged 18.

Apprentices from Sheaf Training have been helping to clear up Parkwood Springs and installed a wooden seat alongside one of the footpaths though the wood. Ranger James Smith (right) and apprentices Mitchell Parker (left) and Daniel Barnes, both aged 18.

The team of young men – working towards a diploma in work-based horticulture – took part in a specially-organised clean-up at Parkwood Springs.

They cleared pathways and removed invasive scrub from the heathland area.

And once they had the area back to its best, the apprentices installed a new bench for visitors.

The trainees attend Sheaf Training one day a week and the rest of the time they have work placement. The event was organised to coincide with National Apprentice Week.

Coun Leigh Bramall, Sheffield Council cabinet member for business, skills and development said: “We are committed to supporting young people who are keen to begin their careers through apprenticeships and we’re well on the way to achieving our target of 200 apprentices in the first two years of the scheme.

“They are a proven way of providing valuable training young people need in a range of work placements and this scheme also part-funds employers wishing to offer young people this important first step on the career ladder.”

Council ranger James Smith worked with horticulture tutor John Abson on the project.

He said: “The lads did a fantastic job. They had to do a lot of hard-digging to get the bench in but they did it well.

“It’s always nice for us to get an extra pair of hands, particularly when you’ve got a lot to achieve with these bigger tasks like this one.

“We rely on the work of volunteers to keep these areas looking good for people to enjoy.”