SLIDESHOW: Manor Lodge goes back to wartime for grand opening

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A Sheffield landmark went back in time this bank-holiday weekend, giving tourists a glimpse into life during the Second World War.

Swapping wireless for washboards, Sheffield’s Manor Lodge cottages were opened up in style for a day of 1940s fun, leaving the present day behind.

A special 1940s open day and party was held at the Manor Lodge Cottages to celebrate their grand opening. Pictured from the 1939-45 Allied Group are Robert Ocheduszko, Robin Edge, and Ian Beck.

A special 1940s open day and party was held at the Manor Lodge Cottages to celebrate their grand opening. Pictured from the 1939-45 Allied Group are Robert Ocheduszko, Robin Edge, and Ian Beck.

Warden John Barnes and his family helped to showcase what life was really like in war-time Sheffield with the grand opening of their home to the public.

For those interested in 1940s fashions, a vintage hairdresser was on hand to provide a bit of war-time chic by giving those in attendance victory rolls hairstyles.

And there were plenty of other activities too - including demonstrations of how to use a stirrup pump to put out an incendiary bomb, rag rugging and old fashioned washing with a dolly and mangle.

Mr Barnes, played by living history officer Andy Messer, told The Star: “It has been great for people to see how far we’ve come with Manor Cottages.

He continued: “It was great to see so many people here to join in the celebrations as we opened up our 1940s family home.

“I’ve been busy inside the cottage hanging new wallpaper in my parlour and bedroom and making sure all the paint work is spick and span ready for the grand opening of my new home.”

Working horse, Big Lad also joined the party, delighting Mr Barnes and his family’s guests.

And the Pontefract Home Guard were present and correct carrying out children’s drills throughout the day.

For those curious about what food was like on a ration diet, 1940s food was on offer provided by the Rhubarb shed café.

Jane Hughes attended the event with her granddaughter Harriet Day, aged seven.

“It’s been a wonderful day, they’ve really made it look just how it should,” said Mrs Hughes of Ulverston Road, Woodseats.

“I think everyone should learn a bit about what life was like then.”

Manor Lodge is one of the city’s most unique heritage attractions with Tudor ruins, a farm, 1940s cottage, café, Bramall Court and artists’ studios all set in a beautiful urban meadow landscape.

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