Signs point visitors to crash memorial in Sheffield park

SIGNS pointing visitors to Endcliffe Park to the memorial marking the wartime crash of B-17 bomber Mi-Amigo.
SIGNS pointing visitors to Endcliffe Park to the memorial marking the wartime crash of B-17 bomber Mi-Amigo.
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Signs pointing visitors in a Sheffield park to a memorial marking a Second World War plane crash site have been erected thanks to a local author.

New research by military historian Paul Allonby has shed fresh light on the fate of the crew of the US B17 bomber Mi Amigo, who all perished when their bomber crashed into a wooded hillside behind what is now Endcliffe Park’s cafe.

The Mi-Amigo crew returning from a mission to Germany in January 1944'The crewmen on the left  forefront are from a different crew, then there is (left to right) Lt Kriegshauser (flat peaked cap, sheepskin-collared flying jacket); 'Mi-Amigo' navigator Lt John Humphrey (forage cap); air gunner Sgt Vito Ambrosio ('Castro' style cap with tool pouch on belt); radio operator Sgt Rob Mayfield, and bombardier Lt Melchor Hernandez (with bags).

The Mi-Amigo crew returning from a mission to Germany in January 1944'The crewmen on the left forefront are from a different crew, then there is (left to right) Lt Kriegshauser (flat peaked cap, sheepskin-collared flying jacket); 'Mi-Amigo' navigator Lt John Humphrey (forage cap); air gunner Sgt Vito Ambrosio ('Castro' style cap with tool pouch on belt); radio operator Sgt Rob Mayfield, and bombardier Lt Melchor Hernandez (with bags).

Signs were commissioned by Sheffield Council after Mr Allonby’s book on the event, Courage Above The Clouds, was read by some staff in the parks department.

The signs have been erected near the children’s play area and the park’s main entrance at the Hunters Bar roundabout.

Mr Allonby, aged 56, of Old Whittington, Chesterfield, said: “There is enduring interest in the crash of Mi Amigo which happened on the hillside behind the park’s café.

“But, when I was carrying out local research, one comment I kept hearing was that the memorial stone to the crew was a little tucked away.

“Another comment was, ‘I’d go and visit if I knew where it was’.’’

The signs direct visitors along a woodland walk to the stone which is fitted with two plaques marking the crew’s heroism.

An annual memorial service is also held at the stone, organised by the RAF Association and St Augustine’s Church, Endcliffe.