Shop or more stores drop

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THE fate of HMV is a lesson for high street shops.

Once big names are falling by the wayside as the march of time claims more victims.

The switch from the pavements to the PC is having a profound effect on city centres.

And it is clear that unless shops adapt to changing times, they will not survive.

This could happen to any big name. HMV was a giant in the 1980s, but as shopping trends changed, it adapted too late.

Now it is paying the price – something we should and do care about. When jobs are being lost and local suppliers are losing orders, the demise of big names is important.

How we react to this holds the key to the fate of other shops. One thing is certain, they need all the help they can get.

So if you like a trip into town and a walk along the high street, you have to support the traders who are there.

But if you choose the internet because it’s convenient, do not complain when the next big name goes.

Will we buy the Tramlines ticket?

ANOTHER sign of changing times is the likelihood that there will be a charge for this year’s Tramlines music festival.

The twin blow of sponsor Nokia due to bow out and Sheffield Council cutting its funding makes a charge almost inevitable.

This is significant because once people have had something for free, they tend to expect it to remain that way.

So Tramlines promoters face a challenging task convincing people to pay for tickets.

Is last year’s 165,000 attendance figure out of reach? Perhaps the festival will have to be marketed as more of a niche event.

Whatever the promoters decide, we hope Tramlines remains a significant event on the city calendar.

It has brought so much to Sheffield and deserves to continue as a much-loved festival.

Obey simple rule

ANY rise in the drink drive figures, no matter how slight, is always disappointing.

It shows there are still idiots who fail to realise that they are putting our lives at risk.

They either don’t know or don’t care that almost 10 per cent of collisions involve drink drivers. They should abide by this simple rule: alcohol and driving should never be mixed.