Sheffield teenage movie-makers explore ethnic diversity

L-R: Ahmed Osman, teachers Helen Barker and Chris Wadsworth, Hager Asker, Tyra Ferguson, Eden Birch, Brandon Moss (sitting down), Rita Saddler, Siobhan Trotman, Janine Bradbury and Sosan Ismail.''Pupils from King Edward VII School, Sheffield in the We Are Here project with tutors and mentors.
L-R: Ahmed Osman, teachers Helen Barker and Chris Wadsworth, Hager Asker, Tyra Ferguson, Eden Birch, Brandon Moss (sitting down), Rita Saddler, Siobhan Trotman, Janine Bradbury and Sosan Ismail.''Pupils from King Edward VII School, Sheffield in the We Are Here project with tutors and mentors.
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CULTURES of Caribbean and African countries have been celebrated in Sheffield schools to mark Black History Month.

Youngsters explored the roots, heritage and history of black and ethnic communities in activities organised as part of the four-week national campaign.

A group of 10 pupils from King Edward VII School, Broomhill, saw their documentary film We Are Here, brought to the big screen in a premiere at the Showroom Cinema.

The film, which looks at higher education, identity and aspirations, was created by the school’s black pupils’ achievement group as part of a Sheffield University project which asks students, lecturers and schoolteachers to use subjects to widen access to culture among black and ethnic minority pupils in the city.

Yousif Hassan, 15, a Year 10 pupil at the school said: “I realise now it doesn’t matter what background you are from, or who you are, you can still go to university and achieve the job that you want and lead the life you want.”

Janine Bradbury, project officer, said: “This film reflects the ongoing and valuable conversation we are having with this group of young people about higher education, aspiration, and identity.

“It is important the university nurtures a space where young people can develop a sense of self-expression, self-reflection and self-development, and literature and film are a fantastic way of enabling that.”

Children at St Patrick’s Catholic Primary School, Barnsley Road enjoyed an international celebration of cultures for Black History Month.

Parents of pupils from different corners of the globe – from Jamaica, to Ghana, to India and Burma – visited the classroom to discuss their culture with children.

Pupils were given a taste of life in different countries when they sampled foods such as curried goat and traditionally-brewed Eritrean coffee.

Victoria Elliot, learning mentor at St Patrick’s, said: “We have a multi-cultural school with lots of parents and pupils from different backgrounds, so we organised an event which celebrated Black History Month and embrace all of the different cultures.

“It was really good, the Lord Mayor was there to show his support.”