Sheffield’s Scots say ‘No’ as referendum polls open

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Scottish Sheffielders have urged their fellow Scots north of the border to vote ‘no’ today when polling on independence opens.

Scotland will today decide whether to become an independent nation, splitting the United Kingdom apart.

A Yes campaign rally outside the Glasgow Concert Hall ahead of the Scottish independence referendum that takes place tomorrow. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday September 17, 2014. See PA story REFERENDUM Main. Photo credit should read: Lynne Cameron/PA Wire

A Yes campaign rally outside the Glasgow Concert Hall ahead of the Scottish independence referendum that takes place tomorrow. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday September 17, 2014. See PA story REFERENDUM Main. Photo credit should read: Lynne Cameron/PA Wire

Sheffield University experts have weighed up the potential ramifications of a ‘yes’ vote, while members of the Sheffield Caledonian Society are pushing for a no.

Sheila Cook, of ex-pats group the Sheffield Caledonian Society, used to live in Aberdeenshire, but now lives on Grove Road, Millhouses.

The 76-year-old called on the people of Scotland to reject independence.

She said: “I am really sad to think we might break away.

“I had a friend visit from Edinburgh and she knows a lot of people who will vote no, but no-one wants to put a poster up because they will get a brick through their window.

“I’m a Scot first, but I’m also British and proud of the union.

“I know that’s the view of most of the society.”

Another society member, who did not wish to be named, said: “In my opinion it should be a no.

“ I am part of the UK. This is our country. I think the whole thing is ludicrous.”

Scott Lavery, of the Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute at The University of Sheffield, said: “In reality, support for the SNP has risen because it has out-manoeuvred Labour to the left on many issues - abolishing tuition fees, providing daycare for the elderly and free prescriptions for all, while opposing nuclear weapons and war in Iraq.

“Whatever the outcome of the referendum, the fault-lines of Scottish politics have shifted.

“Devolution has not ‘killed nationalism stone dead’, as some commentators predicted, but has galvanised a new debate about the future of Scotland.”