Sheffield marks Hiroshima Day

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Folk turned out in force to mark Hiroshima Day in Sheffield, a day of remembrance in The Peace Gardens.

For decades it has been a rare slice of quiet in the midst of Sheffield’s urban jungle, a tranquil getaway from the hustle and bustle of Fargate and The Moor.

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The Peace Gardens began life in 1938 and were originally named St Paul’s Gardens, after the church which was demolished.

The gardens have undergone various changes in the time since, the most dramatic being the Goodwin Fountain being moved from Fargate and reworked for the Peace Gardens’ centrepiece today.

The gardens take their name from an agreement signed with Germany just before World War Two, the Munich Agreement, a treaty permitting Hitler’s Nazi Germany to annexe parts of Czechoslovakia, in 1938, the same year the gardens were built.

It turns out, then, that the Peace Gardens’ name is a little bit ironic, although there are several plaques in the gardens dedicated to those who lost their lives in the war and during the Spanish Civil War of 1936 to 1939.

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It also contains a memorial to Hiroshima, unveiled on Hiroshima Day, August 8, 1985, in the presence of three survivors of the atomic devastation.

The Bochum Bell was donated by Sheffield’s twin city in Germany.

Today, the gardens are a an award-winning space, having claimed the Entente Florale in 2005 and the RIBA National Urban Design Award in 1999.

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